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7M enrolled doesn't guarantee health law's success

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Photo - FILE - This March 31, 2014, file photo, shows a waiting filled with applicants waiting to be called during a health care enrollment event at the Bay Area Rescue Mission in Richmond, Calif.  Seven million sign-ups proves there's an appetite in the country for President Barack Obama's health care law, but it doesn't guarantee success for America's newest social program. The top priorities for the administration now guaranteeing that premiums remain affordable next year, making enrollment simpler, and improving subpar customer service. Republican opponents also face some tough questions: as millions of people get insurance, how long can the GOP's repeal strategy remain a viable political option?  (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
FILE - This March 31, 2014, file photo, shows a waiting filled with applicants waiting to be called during a health care enrollment event at the Bay Area Rescue Mission in Richmond, Calif. Seven million sign-ups proves there's an appetite in the country for President Barack Obama's health care law, but it doesn't guarantee success for America's newest social program. The top priorities for the administration now guaranteeing that premiums remain affordable next year, making enrollment simpler, and improving subpar customer service. Republican opponents also face some tough questions: as millions of people get insurance, how long can the GOP's repeal strategy remain a viable political option? (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Seven million people signed up, so there is an appetite for President Barack Obama's health care law.

But that doesn't guarantee success for the country's newest social program.

The next enrollment season, which starts Nov. 15, will bring big challenges.

First off, keeping premiums and other consumer costs in check.

Close behind — overhauling an enrollment process that was advertised as customer-friendly but turned out to be an ordeal.

Health insurance expert Larry Levitt of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation says the Obama administration has demonstrated that the law can work, but people are a ways off from being able to judge its success.

Republican opponents of the law keep pushing for a repeal, but as millions get insurance, how long can the party's strategy remain a politically viable option?

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