Policy: Environment & Energy

Abbott concedes chemical data 'challenging' to get

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Photo - File - In this April 2, 2014 file photo, Attorney General and Republican gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott speaks in San Antonio. Attorney General Greg Abbott has decided previously that the state doesn't have to disclose what potentially dangerous chemicals plants around Texas store. But he now clarifies that ordinary Texans are free to ask the plants on their own. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
File - In this April 2, 2014 file photo, Attorney General and Republican gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott speaks in San Antonio. Attorney General Greg Abbott has decided previously that the state doesn't have to disclose what potentially dangerous chemicals plants around Texas store. But he now clarifies that ordinary Texans are free to ask the plants on their own. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Texas,2014 Elections,Campaigns,Energy and Environment,Wendy Davis,Greg Abbott

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Attorney General Greg Abbott is conceding that learning where dangerous chemicals are stored in Texas can be a challenge.

The Republican nominee for governor has faced scrutiny since a May ruling by his office that tightened public access to information about chemical stockpiles in their communities. He told reporters this week that most people could still identify chemical facilities with a "drive around" their neighborhood.

But in an interview Wednesday, Abbott told The Associated Press that the information is "challenging to get."

He's proposing that fire stations replace the state as the first stop for citizens who want to know whether large quantities of dangerous chemicals are nearby.

A spokesman for Democrat Wendy Davis, Abbott's opponent in November, mocked that plan and accused Abbott of scrambling after a backlash.

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