Share

African Leaders Talk Rise in Extremism

|
News,World

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan said the past decade had seen a significant rise in extremism in Africa, as six African heads of state gathered in the Kenyan capital Nairobi on Tuesday for an African Union counter-terrorism summit. (Sept. 2)

SHOTLIST:

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Nairobi, Kenya - September 2, 2014

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Goodluck Jonathan, Nigerian President:

"The past decade has been characterized by the rise of violent extremism and terrorism on the continent, as shown that attacks carried out in the Sahelo-Saharan region, Nigeria, Central Africa and East Africa. The threat is further complicated by the growing links between terrorism and transnational organized crime, most notably drug and arms trafficking, human smuggling, illicit proliferation of weapons and money laundering. There is no doubt that terrorism today poses one of the grievous threats to international peace and security."

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Uhuru Kenyatta, Kenyan President:

"Radicalization of vulnerable youth through violent messaging continues to be one of the reasons why terrorist organizations attract recruits from a global audience and use the world wide web and social media to reach vulnerable youth easily."

STORYLINE:

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan said the past decade had seen a significant rise in extremism in Africa, as six African heads of state gathered in the Kenyan capital Nairobi on Tuesday for an African Union counter-terrorism summit.

The leaders, along with multiple high-level ministers and ambassadors, condemned attacks in the Sahelo-Saharan region, Horn of Africa and Central Africa, including those by Boko Haram, al-Qaida, al-Shabab and the Lord's Resistance Army.

"The past decade has been characterized by the rise of violent extremism and terrorism on the continent, as shown that attacks carried out in the Sahelo-Saharan region, Nigeria, Central Africa and East Africa," Jonathan told the gathering.

"The threat is further complicated by the growing links between terrorism and transnational organized crime, most notably drug and arms trafficking, human smuggling, illicit proliferation of weapons and money laundering. There is no doubt that terrorism today poses one of the grievous threats to international peace and security," he added.

The heads of state also met in a closed session to outline "concrete steps" to address extremism.

Other groups were also invited to participate, including the United Nations, European Union and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, which pledged 10 (m) million US dollars to the African Union Peace and Security Council for counter-terrorism efforts.

View article comments Leave a comment

More from washingtonexaminer.com