AP Honors Niedringhaus at Funeral in Germany

|
News,World

AP Exec. Editor Kathleen Carroll and Dir. of Photography Santiago Lyon honor Anja Niedringhaus, who was killed in Afghanistan, at her funeral on Saturday. A priest also read a letter from AP's Kathy Gannon who was injured in the same attack. (April 12)

SHOTLIST:

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Hoexter, Germany - April 12, 2014

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Kathleen Carroll, Associated Press Executive Editor:

"She showed calm, while all around was chaos. And I believe that is why her pictures from terrible places resonated with so many people around the world. She found their dignity, she found the quiet, human moments that connected people in great strife to all the rest of us around the world."

++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY WHITE FLASH++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Santiago Lyon, Associated Press Director of Photography:

"The light is from her extraordinary life and her example is what can save us from crashing against the rocks of despair. The light is from her professionalism, and from her magnificent and powerful and poignant and telling photographs."

++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY WHITE FLASH++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Bernd Mueller, Parish Priest (reading letter from AP reporter Kathy Gannon):

++SOUNDBITE PARTIALLY COVERED BY B-ROLL++

4. Wide of photo of Niedringhaus with candles and flowers

5. Wide of congregation

6. Mid of coffin

7. Tight of photo of Niedringhaus

STORYLINE:

The funeral of Associated Press photojournalist Anja Niedringhaus, who was killed by a police commander in Afghanistan last week, was held in Germany on Saturday.

The service was held at Corvey Abbey in Niedringhaus' birthplace of Hoexter.

Niedringhaus, 48, and senior AP correspondent Kathy Gannon were shot in their own car with an AP freelancer and a translator in the city of Khost, eastern Afghanistan, on April 4.

Gannon, 60, was severely wounded in both wrists and the right shoulder.

Bernd Mueller, a parish priest, read a letter from Gannon where she recalled some of Neidringhaus' last words: "I am so happy."

At the service, Niedringhaus was remembered as someone who brought humanity to places of war and suffering.

Colleagues also remembered her infectious sense of humor and raucous laugh.

The shooting was the first known case of a security insider attacking journalists in Afghanistan - part of a surge in violence targeting foreigners.

View article comments Leave a comment