Opinion: Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor: Oct. 15, 2012

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Opinion,Letters to the Editor

Kudos to Metro for defending controversial ad

Re: "Metro riders give more makeovers to anti-jihad ad," Oct. 10

Great balanced article on an important subject by Examiner reporter Kytja Weir.

The use of the word "savages" for the jihadists is absolutely the right terminology to describe these beheaders, throat cutters and suicide/homicide bombers. This Stone Age crowd wants to destroy civilization as we know it by converting everybody else to Islam and imposing the anti-human code of social behavior known as Sharia.

Debbie Polhemus was a fool for masking the ad with Post-it notes in the naive belief that she was suppressing "hate speech." Great move by Metro for removing the notes from the ad at its Takoma station.

Michael Gloukhov

Fairfax

Legalizing drugs is only way to end the carnage

Re: "Mexico navy: Zetas cartel leader apparently killed," Oct. 9

The death of Hriberto Laxcano, the top Zetas drug cartel leader, is certainly welcome news for Mexican law enforcement. However, this will have little impact on the remaining cartels in the country.

The violence these cartels engage in is undeniably reprehensible and disgusting. However, as long as they are able to make an enormous profit from the illegal drugs they sell in the United States and the rest of the world, they will continue to terrorize the Mexican people and undermine that country's institutions.

There are no real victories in the seemingly never-ending tragedy that is our failed war on drugs. The only solution is to legalize drugs in both countries, effectively eliminating the Mexican cartels' source of income, which will bring them to an end once and for all.

Lauren Galik

Washington

Democrats advocate policies rejected by communists

I don't understand why Democrats target the wealthy, attack outsourcing, and criticize Mitt Romney for laying off workers when he was CEO of Bain Capital.

Those of us who have lived in communist/socialist countries have seen both sides. Communists in Russia and China targeted and shamed the wealthy before they took power, and confiscated their property afterwards. They blamed the rich for the condition of the poor, but redistribution just pulled everybody down. In the end, the wealth mysteriously disappeared.

Decades ago, China offered all citizens "iron bowl" jobs for life with no evaluations, no changing jobs, and no incentives for working smarter and more efficiently. But the economy stagnated under this policy and everybody was similarly, if not equally, poor. After realizing its shortcomings, China abandoned it. Nationalized entities were allowed to go private and competition led to flourishing small businesses.

"Let a few people get rich first" was the famous phrase from Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, who bravely broke with communist principle that all men shall be equal in everything, including poverty. Nowadays, China has outsourced some of its manufacturing sectors in order to focus on more advanced technology in the globalized economy.

Patriotism is shallow if it only means shutting the doors to the outside world. Many new jobs could be created to replace the ones we're trying too hard to hang onto.

A performance-based evaluation is widely accepted around the world and is considered the most effective and successful management tool. Giving workers a permanent job for life binds them from improving their lot. Would you really want to work for a company where neither the employer nor the employees have a choice?

Helen Zheng

Gaithersburg

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