Wizards trying to keep Kevin Seraphin posted

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Cheers and Jeers,Sports,NBA,Wizards,Craig Stouffer

Moods were lighter and smiles wider at the end of Wizards practice Wednesday, a day after they toppled the NBA champion Miami Heat.

The session was shut down early after a huge dunk by Shaun Livingston.

"A full windmill," A.J. Price said. "Not a chin-mill. In New York we say chin-mill if you get it right in there."

That doesn't mean Wednesday was all about flashy dunks. Kevin Seraphin and Nene took turns afterward working on post moves. Wizards assistant coach Don Newman, wielding a blocking pad, pushed into Seraphin, then slapped the ball loose as the third-year big man tried to pivot in the lane.

"Hold on to the ball," screamed Wizards coach Randy Wittman, adding to Seraphin's frustration that he hadn't been allowed to complete his move.

"I'm not mad," Seraphin said, but Newman was smartly shying away by the time the exercise finished.

Seraphin had 16 points against Miami, including eight during a fourth quarter in which he was 4-for-5 from the field. But while the Wizards (2-13) had 29 free throw attempts, the 6-foot-9, 275-pound Seraphin didn't get to the line once.

"We're trying to continue his growth in the post of being more able, getting to the foul line, drawing contact, being more aggressive in a face-up nature, attacking," Wittman said. "If you're in the bonus, a hand check, that's two free throws instead of always settling for a quick move without that."

Seraphin (7-for-12) has fewer free throw attempts than any other player who has appeared in at least 14 of the Wizards' 15 games. That includes Jan Vesely (3-for-13), who didn't play at all against the Heat.

"I have to go more on my guy when I play because right now I just play with my hook, my shot," Seraphin said. "Like Nene did, I need more power move, go on my guy and try to get a foul."

Since his return from injury, Nene hasn't showed much of the midrange jumper that he used so effectively late last season. But maybe that's to the benefit of Seraphin, who looks up to his frontcourt teammate.

"I look at everything he do," Seraphin said. "Even if he drink something, I will look at how he drink. I just look at him every time."

- Craig Stouffer

cstouffer@washingtonexaminer.com

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