Major area PCP supplier goes on the run, marshals say

By |
Local,Crime,Scott McCabe

U.S. Marshals deputies are looking for a man suspected of being one of the largest suppliers of PCP in the Washington area, and they are asking for information that can lead to an arrest.

Joseph Craig Hall, 37, is wanted on federal charges in the possession with the intent to sell more than a kilo (or 2.2 pounds) of PCP. He faces a penalty of up to 10 years to life if convicted.

Authorities say they are disturbed by the increased use of PCP in the D.C. area, which they say often leads to more violent and hideous crimes.

"This is a very dangerous chemical and we definitely don't need anyone spreading it through our community," said Supervisory Inspector Matt Burke, of the Capital Area Regional Fugitive Task Force. "We'd like to get Hall into custody and shut down his business quickly before any more of this stuff hits the streets."

Hall, who has a history of arrests on drugs, firearms, theft, resisting arrest and assault charges, has ties to Silver Spring and District Heights, as well as various parts of Washington.

Hall is known to hang out in D.C. nightclubs and was in stabbed outside a one club this summer, Burke said.

Hall was indicted in September, and immediately went on the run, authorities said. He is described as being 6-feet-tall and 175 pounds with a tattoo on his right arm.

Anyone with information should contact the U.S. Marshals Fugitive Task Force at 301-489-1717.

Since 2008, the "Most Wanted" feature has led directly to the capture or surrender of 49 people -- including murderers, armed robbers, kidnappers, sex offenders, drug dealers and con artists -- federal officials say. At least eight captured were wanted in a killing or had previously been convicted of a homicide.

The CARFTF, run by the U.S. Marshals Service, is composed of 30 federal, state and local agencies from Baltimore to Norfolk, Va.

smccabe@washingtonexaminer.com

View article comments Leave a comment
Author:

Scott McCabe

Staff Writer - Crime
The Washington Examiner