Chamber music's timelessness explored

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Entertainment,Music,Marie Gullard

It is not every day that a person can sit back and be serenaded as though part of an elite gathering at the court of England's King George II. Such is the power of the New York-based chamber trio Repast Baroque to melodically transport its audience back to the 17th and 18th centuries with a bit of stringed nourishment for the soul.

The group's program Sunday afternoon at the Montgomery College Cultural Arts Center is titled "Music for Several Friends" and is presented by the Bach Sinfonia, a Maryland-based organization dedicated to excellence in performance and public awareness of baroque and classical music.

"For nine seasons or more, [the Sinfonia] has always presented at least one other group as part of our series itself," noted conductor and artistic director Daniel Abraham. "The groups we invite tend to be true chamber groups in the real sense of the word 'chamber,' meaning one performer to a part. In this case, [we have] a very fine virtuoso trio of performers."

Repast Baroque consists of violinist Amelia Roosevelt, John Mark Rozendaal playing the cellolike viola da gamba and Daniel Swenberg on theorbo, a lutelike instrument with a very long neck. Just as the type of music performed, these instruments, as well, date to the 17th and 18th centuries.

Onstage
The Bach Sinfonia presents Repast Baroque
Where: Montgomery College Cultural Arts Center, 7995 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring
When: 3 p.m. Sunday
Info: $15 to $30, 14 and under free; 301-362-6525; bachsinfonia.org

The afternoon's program has been carefully chosen to highlight the particular, somewhat mellower sounds produced from the strings of these three instruments.

"The thread of the program is basically intimate music made for small settings," Roosevelt pointed out, referring to Matthew Locke's 17th-century piece "Music for Several Friends" and Henry Butler's Sonata in G Major.

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Marie Gullard

Special to The Washington Examiner
The Washington Examiner