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Local spotlight on Tuesday

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Entertainment,Buzz

MODERN DANCE

The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is the definitive modern dance company, redefining what modern dance is with each performance. The New York-based company, which often serves as ambassador for American culture abroad, has strong roots in African dance and combines everything from ballet to jazz as its 32 dancers leap across the stage with long lines and strong arms.

In its annual engagement at the Kennedy Center, the company will perform a mixed repertory program including "Revelations," a classic that pays tribute to Ailey's black heritage through traditional spirituals. On stage at the Opera House (2700 F St. NW) from Tuesday through Sunday, performances will differ from night to night and will feature a combination of captivating new work and enduring classics, all with the passionate energy that AAADT is known for. Tickets cost $30 to $120. Visit kennedy-center.org for dates and times.

TRUNK SHOW

Crystal Couture is back and it's bringing with it more than 40 of the metro area's most stylish boutiques and designers to the top floor of 251 18th St. in Crystal City. This high-end fashion event hosts dozens of the area's hottest models. They'll be walking the runway sporting all types of design. Fashion lovers can enjoy a big trunk sale, a cash bar, and even free makeup and hair makeovers. Looking for some style advice? Wardrobe stylists will be on hand to answer your fashion questions.

If you've been to Crystal Couture before, you'll remember that it was held in an underground food court. This year, it will take place in an office building with spectacular views of the city.

The event starts Tuesday and continues through Saturday from 6 to 10 p.m. The best part is it's free! For information, visit crystalcity.org/artful/couture.

BEHIND BARS

"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere," wrote the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. while sitting in an Alabama jail cell. He penned this in defense of civil disobedience in a historic letter while confined after his April 1963 arrest for leading nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Ala.

To celebrate Black History Month, the Newseum opens Jailed in Birmingham, a new exhibit featuring a casting of the original cell door that played witness to King's now-famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail." The door on display is a bronze casting made from the original door in the Birmingham City Jail. The exhibit also features one of the first publications of the letter, a 1963 pamphlet published by the American Friends Service Committee, a Quaker group. The exhibit is on display in the Newseum's News Corporation News History Gallery (555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW).

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