D.C. police ID two teens, Mercedes sought in NoMa drive-by shooting

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Local,DC,Crime,Scott McCabe

D.C. police are looking for two teenagers and a luxury car in connection with the NoMa shooting that left 13 injured, one critically.

Craig Wilson, 19, of D.C. is wanted on a charge of assault with intent to kill while armed in connection with the drive-by outside the Tyler House low-income housing complex on the edge of the gentrifying neighborhood.

Police are looking for another 19-year-old, Andrew Davon Allen, because they say he may have information about the shooting. He has not been charged.

Police also released an enhanced image and license plate numbers of one of the two vehicles used in the attack on North Capitol Street. The other vehicle has been tracked down.

No arrests had been made as of Thursday evening.

"We're getting there," said D.C. police Cmdr. George Kucik. "We're still trying to figure things out."

Investigators are still interviewing a long list of witnesses and sifting through a large amount of evidence, Kucik said.

The shooting took place about 2:10 a.m. Monday near the corner of North Capitol Street and New York Avenue NW, shortly after a nearby nightclub closed its doors. D.C. police are investigating whether the shooting was connected to a fight at the Fur Nightclub.

Police said people in the crowd may have returned gunfire and as many as 70 shots were fired.

Police are still looking for a black or dark blue 1999 Mercedes Benz CLK 320 coupe with D.C. tags EF7810.

Wilson is described as black, 6-foot-2 and 140 pounds with brown eyes, black hair and a dark complexion.

Wilson has a large tattoo of a revolver on the front of his neck.

Wilson is on probation for stealing merchandise from an American Apparel shop in Georgetown last summer, police said.

Allen is described as black, 5-foot-8 and 150 pounds with brown eyes, black hair and a medium complexion.

Anyone with information on the shooting case is asked to call police at 202-727-9099. The Metropolitan Police Department is offering a reward of up to $10,000 to anyone who provides information that leads to a conviction.

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