Caitlin Rose Blossoms with New Songs

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Entertainment,Music,Nancy Dunham

Feel free to categorize Caitlin Rose's music, but don't expect her to do so.

As the daughter of renowned songwriter Liz Rose, who's penned hits for Taylor Swift, Lee Ann Womack and others, many in and out of the music business were quick to look at the younger Rose as the second coming of her mother. And while she's proud of her mother's achievements, she is comfortable with not following in anyone else's footsteps.

"I listen to a whole lot of music and I try not to compare myself to other people," she said. "Comparisons like that do the artists a disservice. I say put it wherever you want. I don't really think about it."

What she does think about is the best way to weave a story. That's true whether the songs are confessional, such as on her 2010 debut album, "Own Side Now," and her just-released sophomore record, "The Stand-In," which includes songs about the world she sees and imagines, such as "Pink Champagne," inspired by Joan Didion's writing about Las Vegas wedding chapels.

Onstage
Caitlin Rose with Andrew Combs
» Where: Jammin' Java, 227 Maple Ave. East, Vienna
» When: 7:30 p.m. Friday
» Info: $12 to $15; 703-255-1566; jamminjava.com

"Everywhere I go, I get ideas," she said. " 'Pink Champagne' was written because I picked up a Joan Didion essay book while I was on tour and I read 'Marrying Absurd.' I hadn't been reading. I had been trying to exist in a bubble, and that was my foray into song ideas."

Rose turned a critical eye to the weddings in Las Vegas for that song and then moved ahead to exploring a host of male and female relationships from a host of perspectives. She joined with longtime friends/co-writers and fellow producers Jordan Lehning and Skylar Wilson to write and record the album. She includes two covers, including "I Was Cruel" by the Deep Vibrations and "Dallas" by the Felice Brothers.

"These are two people I've known since before I can remember," Rose said. "Jordan was one of the first people I met who said I didn't have to be a [traditional] country artist. He was there for the shift in my sound. Skylar was there to help me put together my first band. ... We are all very comfortable in each other's lives. Writing together is just natural for us."

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Author:

Nancy Dunham

Examiner Correspondent
The Washington Examiner