Talking Points: Lizard people in government, time travel, rowing the Atlantic

|
Local,Talking Points

Do lizard people run the government?

According to a new poll from Public Policy Polling, 4 percent of Americans believe "shape-shifting reptilian people control our world by taking on human form and gaining political power" -- and that was just one of the weird conspiracy theories that some people subscribe to. Fifteen percent believe drug companies and the medical industry invent new diseases to make money, and 20 percent believe vaccines cause autism. Nine percent think the government adds fluoride to water for "sinister reasons," and 21 percent are sure a UFO landed in Roswell, N.M. Quite a few people, 37 percent, think global warming is a hoax. And in case you are taking comfort in the scant 4 percent who were buying into the lizard people -- 7 percent said they weren't sure.

Is there a way to go back in time?

Sort of. If you are in New York between now and May 26. That is when an interactive art exhibit will be operating though some 5,000 pay phones still dotting the corners of Manhattan. Pick up the receiver and punch 1-855-FOR-1993, and you will hear a notable resident recounting what life was like on that block 20 years ago. The narrators describe a New York that was dirtier, bloodier, raunchier and less gentrified than today -- but also an easier place for a talented young person to gain a foothold. Bike shop owner Dave Ortiz remembers when the city's Meatpacking District, now home to trendy restaurants, nightclubs and pricey boutiques, was the wild, wild West. "The rats were huge," he said. "They were as big as cats, so you had to walk in the middle of the street. It's amazing what they turned it into. It's cool, but it's lost its, like, authenticity."

What happened to the four guys trying to row across the Atlantic?

Their boat capsized, and they had to be rescued. The four were 73 days into their record-setting attempt when a rogue wave tipped the boat over, and it could not be righted. They were some 400 miles north of the U.S. Caribbean island of Puerto Rico and had just 850 miles left of the 4,000-mile trip.

View article comments Leave a comment
Author:

By the staff of
The Washington Examiner