Police, paramedics detail response to Love murder scene

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Capital Land,Virginia,Crime,Emily Babay

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Police and paramedics who first responded to Yeardley Love's apartment testified that they believed they were being called to an alcohol overdose, but a damaged door and Love's bruised made them realize they were at a crime scene.

When Officer K.W. Blackwell saw 22-year-old Love's eye swollen shut and blood on her nose and mouth, "I realized it was nowhere near the report that was given," Blackwell testified Thursday at the murder trial of George Huguely V.

The 24-year-old former University of Virginia lacrosse player from Chevy Chase is accused of beating Love -- his ex-girlfriend -- to death in May 2010.

Charlottesville police Det. Sgt. Shawn Bayles testified that he first became concerned when he got the apartment and saw "a huge hole in the door" to Love's bedroom. When he saw her injuries, Bayles said, he knew that she "was obviously the victiim of some type of act of violence."

Emergency responder Michael Hanshew testified that rescue crews saw "a lot of swelling" on Love's face and performed CPR on her for about 25 minutes. Another emergency responder, Shravan Kumar, said EMTs never detected a heart rhythm in Love.

The jury saw several photographs of the crime scene, Love's injuries and paramedics trying to treat her. Those photographs were only visible to the judge and jury; court spectators could not see the images.

The defense has contended that some of the paramedics' actions contributed to those injuries. Under cross-examination by defense attorney Rhonda Quagliana, Hanshew said it's possible that CPR could cause a bruse to blacken, but he has never seen that happen. Dr. William Brady, a U-Va. emergency physician who did not treat Love but viewed records in the case, said the emergency workers appear to have responded appropriately.

Thursday is the second day of testimony in Huguely's trial. Jury selection took all of Monday and Tuesday.

Huguely faces charges of first-degree murder, felony murder, robbery, burglary, entering a house with intent to commit a felony and grand larceny.

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Emily Babay

Digital News Editor
The Washington Examiner