SPECIAL REPORT- Big Green: A Big Green propaganda film that sparked a dud of a House hearing

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When the documentary "Gasland" premiered at the Sundance film festival in January, it won a special jury prize and created quite a stir. Showing Colorado water taps bursting into flames will do that.

But Gasland is more agit-prop than factual documentary. The film's target is "fracking," a process oil and natural gas engineers have used more than a million times in this country to harvest otherwise unreachable oil and natural gas deposits deep below ground.

The process involves pumping a solution that is 99 percent sand and water, plus a few trace chemicals, thousands of feet underground at high pressure, which creates fractures in the rock formations that allow oil and gas to flow to collection points.

Fracking has been targeted in recent years by the environmental movement that seeks to shut down all or most oil and natural gas production in America, just when vast new stores of both have been found that could help restore U.S. energy independence and cut consumer energy costs dramatically. Thousands of new jobs would also be created, especially in economically depressed areas of Pennylvania, New York, West Virginia and Kentucky.