Opinion

'Ban Bossy' inspired Sinead O'Connor to change her new album title

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Photo - Singer Sinead O'Connor tears up a photo of Pope John Paul II during a live appearance in New York on NBC's "Saturday Night Live" in 1992. Her controversial act came at the end of an a cappella performance of Bob Marley's song "War." (AP Photo/NBC, file)
Singer Sinead O'Connor tears up a photo of Pope John Paul II during a live appearance in New York on NBC's "Saturday Night Live" in 1992. Her controversial act came at the end of an a cappella performance of Bob Marley's song "War." (AP Photo/NBC, file)
Beltway Confidential,Opinion,Entertainment,Music,Ashe Schow,War on Women,Gender Issues,Ban Bossy

Did you know that people still care about Sheryl Sandberg’s “Ban Bossy” campaign? No? Well, you’re probably not alone.

Did you know that Sinead O'Connor was still making music? No? Well, you're definitely not alone.

The Irish singer-songwriter said Monday that she had changed the title of her latest album to “I'm Not Bossy, I'm the Boss” -- inspired by Sandberg's campaign.

“Originally I had a different title, ‘The Vishnu Room,’ but a few months back when I saw the phrase ‘I’m not bossy, I’m the boss’ and became aware of the Ban Bossy campaign, I wished I could re-name the album, since indeed it can be tricky being a female boss, and I think Sheryl’s campaign is a terribly important one,” O’Connor posted on her blog.

O’Connor said she was able to change the title, which made her a “very happy girl.”

If you're not familiar with O'Connor, she's the singer who called Pope John Paul II “the real enemy” on "Saturday Night Live" in 1992.

The Ban Bossy campaign, you may recall, was started by Facebook's chief operating officer -- a billionaire -- who had apparently been called “bossy” when she was in ninth grade. So, 30 years later, she decided to start a campaign to ban the use of the word -- a campaign based on pseudo-science.

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