Belgian papers hedge their bets on election result

|
Photo -   A spread of Belgian newspapers is shown in Brussels on the morning after the U.S. elections, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012. Faced with U.S. election results coming after printing deadlines, Belgian newspapers found novel ways around the problem. Het Laatste Nieuws, middle left, produced two front pages, asking readers to "pick your cover." One was headlined "It's Obama" while another, folded inside, read "It's Romney." De Morgen, bottom right, cut its front page in half, with one side saying "Mitt Romney President" and the other "Barack Obama President." On the Romney side it said "Please turn quickly if Obama is the winner." Le Soir's front page, top left, screamed "Obama," followed on the left with "Has Lost ,read page 2" and on the right "Has Won, read page 3." Sports newspaper La Derniere Heure, top right, left the face blank and instead provided a scan code to download the winner onto a cellphone. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
A spread of Belgian newspapers is shown in Brussels on the morning after the U.S. elections, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012. Faced with U.S. election results coming after printing deadlines, Belgian newspapers found novel ways around the problem. Het Laatste Nieuws, middle left, produced two front pages, asking readers to "pick your cover." One was headlined "It's Obama" while another, folded inside, read "It's Romney." De Morgen, bottom right, cut its front page in half, with one side saying "Mitt Romney President" and the other "Barack Obama President." On the Romney side it said "Please turn quickly if Obama is the winner." Le Soir's front page, top left, screamed "Obama," followed on the left with "Has Lost ,read page 2" and on the right "Has Won, read page 3." Sports newspaper La Derniere Heure, top right, left the face blank and instead provided a scan code to download the winner onto a cellphone. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
News,Business

BRUSSELS (AP) — Faced with U.S. election results coming well after printing deadlines, Belgian newspapers hedged their bets and found novel ways to get the winner on their front pages.

Het Laatste Nieuws produced two front pages Wednesday, one folded inside the other, asking readers to "pick your cover." One was headlined "It's Obama" while the other read "It's Romney." Both had profiles of the winner and analysis.

By the time newspaper stands opened, readers knew the outcome and could remove the wrong one.

De Morgen had a layered front page, with the a half-size sheet saying "Mitt Romney President," overlying a full page that said "Barack Obama President." On the Romney page it said "Please turn quickly if Obama is the winner."

"We actually did not know who was going to win. The polls were so close," De Morgen's editor in chief Wouter Verschelden told The Associated Press.

"We took a little bit of a gamble that Obama was going to win but we did want to have something of Romney in there," he said.

The DH paper was not to be outdone by anyone, though. Its front page was entirely filled by a picture of the president standing at the dais, his face covered by a big QR code.

With a smartphone, people could scan the code to access the website of the paper for a picture of the new president and the accompanying articles.

Meanwhile, Le Soir's front page screamed "Obama," followed on the left by "Has Lost — read page 2" and on the right "Has Won — read page 3."

View article comments Leave a comment