Crime History: Mob boss taken down in Chophouse Massacre

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Local,Crime,Scott McCabe

On this day, Oct. 23, in 1935, Dutch Schultz and four of his mob associates were gunned down at a Newark, N.J., restaurant in what became known as the Chophouse Massacre.

Schultz, who had sought to assassinate special prosecutor Thomas E. Deway, was killed by New York's top mobsters because they feared the wrath of law enforcement officials if Schultz succeeded.

Schultz, 33, managed to stay alive for a day. His last words were a series of ramblings taken down by a police stenographer: "A boy has never wept, nor dashed a thousand kim," and "Oh, oh, dog biscuit, and when he is happy he doesn't get snappy."

The babblings have been an inspiration to numerous writers, including Beat Generation author William S. Burroughs.

- Scott McCabe

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Scott McCabe

Staff Writer - Crime
The Washington Examiner