Policy: Law

Deals in Albany on medical marijuana, Common Core

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Photo - New York State United Teachers President Karen Magee talks with reporters in a hallway at the Capitol on Thursday, June 19, 2014, in Albany, N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo says teachers shouldn't lose their jobs simply because their students performed poorly on the state's new Common Core tests, at least for a few years. Cuomo proposed legislation Thursday that would change how test scores are used in evaluations to prevent teachers deemed "ineffective" or "developing" from facing termination or a denial of tenure based solely on student test scores. Magee says Cuomo's proposal is a "reset button" that ensures teachers won't be unfairly judged based on the controversial new standards. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
New York State United Teachers President Karen Magee talks with reporters in a hallway at the Capitol on Thursday, June 19, 2014, in Albany, N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo says teachers shouldn't lose their jobs simply because their students performed poorly on the state's new Common Core tests, at least for a few years. Cuomo proposed legislation Thursday that would change how test scores are used in evaluations to prevent teachers deemed "ineffective" or "developing" from facing termination or a denial of tenure based solely on student test scores. Magee says Cuomo's proposal is a "reset button" that ensures teachers won't be unfairly judged based on the controversial new standards. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
Education,New York,Marijuana,Medical Marijuana,Law,Common Core

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York lawmakers are working toward adjournment with votes on a proposal to authorize medical marijuana and provide a safety net for teachers concerned about how the Common Core standards might affect evaluations.

The Legislature plans to end its six-month session Friday after working late Thursday.

The medical marijuana legislation crafted by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and top lawmakers would allow qualifying patients to obtain non-smokeable marijuana.

Lawmakers passed Cuomo's proposal to prevent teachers from being fired over poor student scores on tests based on the controversial Common Core standards. The change would apply through the next school year.

Bills not making final cut include ones to raise the minimum wage, create broad public campaign financing, combat human trafficking and extend financial aid to students in the country illegally.

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