Former GOP D.C. Council candidate calls local party 'a sinking ship'

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Local,DC,Alan Blinder

A former Republican candidate for the D.C. Council has resigned from the District's Republican organization.

"I'm not going to be part of a sinking ship," Tim Day told The Washington Examiner on Friday. "What I realized is that being part of a dysfunctional organization that really has no set goals for the District of Columbia doesn't really help me fight for people."

Day, who sat on the D.C. Republican Committee's Executive Committee, drew attention earlier this week when he endorsed at-large Councilwoman Anita Bonds' bid for re-election.

Bonds is a Democrat and the longtime chairwoman of the D.C. Democratic State Committee.

"It's about holding people accountable, and if the Republican Party in the District of Columbia wants to make positive change, they will hop on board behind those who will champion true ethics reform," Day said. "It's not about the Republican Party. It's not about the Democratic Party. It's about the people of our city."

Day said his abrupt exit from the District's Republican Party did not mean he was abandoning his conservative roots. He said he would continue to identify as a Republican, though he has concerns about the party's national platform.SClBNick Jeffress, the local party's executive director, said the D.C. GOP would miss Day's contributions.

"Tim's been a hard worker for the D.C. Republican Committee, and he's done a lot to try to bring good government to D.C.," Jeffress said. "We're upset to see him go, but we completely understand."

Day, an accountant, became a prominent figure in local politics after he uncovered suspicious financial activities by Ward 5 Councilman Harry Thomas Jr. Day's findings prompted the federal probe that ultimately forced Thomas from office and netted him a 38-month prison sentence.SClBWhen Day made his allegations, he was running against Thomas.

ablinder@washingtonexaminer.com

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Author:

Alan Blinder

Staff Reporter, D.C. City Hall
The Washington Examiner