Policy: Law

Georgetown Law professor to use students to lobby against Catholic Church

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Beltway Confidential,Timothy P. Carney,Lobbying,Religion,Law,Catholicism

A Georgetown Law professor plans to use her class to help advance the anti-Catholic agenda of her employer, the National Women's Legal Center.

The professor is Kelli Garcia, senior counsel to the NWLC. The description for her class on "regulatory advocacy" regarding Obamacare includes this interesting passage:

For the practicum part of the course, students will work with the National Women's Law Center to develop projects that will assist in the organization's regulatory advocacy efforts. Students will have the opportunity to participate in strategy meetings and conference calls with the partner organization and other coalition members

So, the students in her class become assistant lobbyists for NWLC. The agenda of NWLC is totally at odds with the teachings of the Catholic Church. The group lobbies for taxpayer subsidies of abortion and contraception.

By having this course, Georgetown is literally bringing scandal on the Catholic Church.

But there's something even more insidious here. Garcia's group — and thus her Georgetown course — don't merely undermine Catholic ideas, they attack Catholic institutions, themselves.

NWLC works against pro-life crisis pregnancy centers -- nonprofit aid organizations that help pregnant women get the healthcare and support they need for either adoption or raising a child. Their offending sin is that some women may show up hoping for an abortion -- and instead they get help for the pregnancy and their baby.

Also central to Garcia's class and NWLC's mission is forcing Catholic institutions like Georgetown to pay for employees' contraception.

Both of these culture-war crusades by the Left involve using the power of the state to smash civil society institutions that try to help people, but don't do it strictly according to elite mores.

The culture war today is largely about that question: Should we have mediating institutions that stand between the individual and the state? This class at Georgetown answers with a firm "no."

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