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Ishtar

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Photo - <p>In this April 18, 2103 photo provided by the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation, the fluke of a humpback whale named Ishtar by researchers is shown after she washed up on an East Quogue. N.Y. beach. Isthar’s cause of death is still under investigation but she had massive cranial damage consistent with a ship strike. Researchers never electronically tagged Ishtar but scientists and whale enthusiasts used the distinctive markings on her fluke to identify her. (AP Photo/Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation)</p>

In this April 18, 2103 photo provided by the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation, the fluke of a humpback whale named Ishtar by researchers is shown after she washed up on an East Quogue. N.Y. beach. Isthar’s cause of death is still under investigation but she had massive cranial damage consistent with a ship strike. Researchers never electronically tagged Ishtar but scientists and whale enthusiasts used the distinctive markings on her fluke to identify her. (AP Photo/Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation)

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In this April 18, 2103 photo provided by the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation, the fluke of a humpback whale named Ishtar by researchers is shown after she washed up on an East Quogue. N.Y. beach. Isthar’s cause of death is still under investigation but she had massive cranial damage consistent with a ship strike. Researchers never electronically tagged Ishtar but scientists and whale enthusiasts used the distinctive markings on her fluke to identify her. (AP Photo/Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation)

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