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Policy: Technology

Justices sometimes do agree: Your privacy matters

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Photo - FILE - This June 30, 2014 file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. Supreme Court justices found more common ground than usual this year, and nowhere was their unanimity more surprising than in ruling that police must get a judge's approval before searching cellphones of people they've arrested. But the conservative-liberal divide was still evident in other cases, including this week's ruling on religion, birth control and the health care law. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
FILE - This June 30, 2014 file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. Supreme Court justices found more common ground than usual this year, and nowhere was their unanimity more surprising than in ruling that police must get a judge's approval before searching cellphones of people they've arrested. But the conservative-liberal divide was still evident in other cases, including this week's ruling on religion, birth control and the health care law. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court justices found more common ground than usual this year, and nowhere was their unanimity more surprising than in ruling that police must get a judge's approval before searching cellphones of people they've arrested.

The term also had its share of 5-4 decisions with the familiar conservative-liberal split, including Monday's ruling on religion, birth control and the health care law.

But the 9-0 cellphone decision last week may be the most consequential of the justices' 67 rulings this term. It signals a high degree of skepticism about the government's authority, without any need to satisfy an impartial judge, to sweep up vast quantities of information that individuals store on computers and cellphones, as well as other records that companies keep online.

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