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LOST RIVER SUCKER

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Photo - <p>This 1995 file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a biologist holding a Lost River sucker taken from southern Oregon's Upper Klamath Lake. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has designated a network of irrigation reservoirs and rivers in Southern Oregon and Northern California as habitat critical survival to the Lost River and short nosed suckers, which have been at the center of bitter water battles in the region for decades. (AP Photo/File)</p>

This 1995 file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a biologist holding a Lost River sucker taken from southern Oregon's Upper Klamath Lake. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has designated a network of irrigation reservoirs and rivers in Southern Oregon and Northern California as habitat critical survival to the Lost River and short nosed suckers, which have been at the center of bitter water battles in the region for decades. (AP Photo/File)

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This 1995 file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a biologist holding a Lost River sucker taken from southern Oregon's Upper Klamath Lake. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has designated a network of irrigation reservoirs and rivers in Southern Oregon and Northern California as habitat critical survival to the Lost River and short nosed suckers, which have been at the center of bitter water battles in the region for decades. (AP Photo/File)

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