Malaysia Vows to Keep Looking for Jet

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Malaysia vowed Saturday that it would not give up trying to find the missing jetliner and said a multinational investigation team would to try to solve the aviation mystery of Malaysian Airlines flight 370. (April 5)

SHOTLIST:

+++WHITE FLASH BETWEEN BITES+++

AP TELEVISIION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - April 5, 2014

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Hishammuddin Hussein, Malaysia's defense minister and acting transport minister: "It's been almost a month since MH370 went missing. The search operation has been difficult, challenging and complex. But despite of all this, our determination remains undiminished. We will continue to search with the same level of vigour and intensity. We owe this to the families on those onboard, and to the wider world. We will continue to focus with all our efforts on finding the aircraft."

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Hishammuddin Hussein, Malaysia's defense minister and acting transport minister: what is more important right now is to remain focused, which is already a very massive task, to locate the aircraft in the Indian Ocean with all its challenges and to coordinate so many countries and so many assets to do that. The sophisticated equipment that's being used in itself is a massive operation. But what gives me strength right now is not about money, is not about apology, but the fact that so many people have looked at it in such a positive way, that have come forward willingly to assist. And that is something that we can all draw strength from because if this goes on any longer, we need every bit of strength that we can, especially to get down, get to the truth of what actually happened to MH370."

STORYLINE:

Malaysia vowed Saturday that it would not give up trying to find the missing jetliner and said a multinational investigation team would to try to solve the aviation mystery, as a Chinese ship involved in the search reported hearing a "pulse signal" in Indian Ocean waters.

Military and civilian planes, ships with deep-sea searching equipment and a British nuclear submarine scoured a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean off Australia's west coast, in an increasingly urgent hunt for debris and the "black box" recorders that hold vital information about Malaysia Airlines Flight 370's last hours.

After weeks of fruitless looking, officials face the daunting prospect that sound-emitting beacons in the flight and voice recorders will soon fall silent as their batteries die after sounding electronic "pings" for a month.

Malaysia vowed Saturday that it would not give up trying to find the missing jetliner and said a multinational investigation team would to try to solve the aviation mystery, as a Chinese ship involved in the search reported hearing a "pulse signal" in Indian Ocean waters.

Military and civilian planes, ships with deep-sea searching equipment and a British nuclear submarine scoured a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean off Australia's west coast, in an increasingly urgent hunt for debris and the "black box" recorders that hold vital information about Malaysia Airlines Flight 370's last hours.

After weeks of fruitless looking, officials face the daunting prospect that sound-emitting beacons in the flight and voice recorders will soon fall silent as their batteries die after sounding electronic "pings" for a month.

China's official Xinhua News Agency reported that a Chinese ship that is part of the search effort detected a "pulse signal" Saturday in southern Indian Ocean waters. The report said it was not yet determined whether the signal was related to the missing jet.

Hishammuddin Hussein, Malaysia's defense minister and acting transport minister, told reporters in Kuala Lumpur that the cost of mounting the search was immaterial compared to providing solace for the families of those on board by establishing what happened.

"I can only speak for Malaysia, and Malaysia will not stop looking for MH370," Hishammuddin said.

He said an independent investigator would be appointed to lead a team that will try to determine what happened to Flight 370. The team will include three groups: One will look at airworthiness, including maintenance, structures and systems; another will examine operations, such as flight recorders and meteorology; and a third will consider medical and human factors.

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