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Monday, May 6, 2013

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News,Science and Technology

3 women who went missing separately a decade ago found at Cleveland home; man arrested

CLEVELAND (AP) — Three women who went missing separately about a decade ago, when they were in their teens or early 20s, were found alive Monday in a residential area just south of downtown, and a man was arrested.

One of the women told a 911 dispatcher the person who had taken her was gone, and she pleaded for police officers to come and get her, saying, "I'm free now."

Cheering crowds gathered Monday night on the street near the home where police said Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michele Knight were found earlier in the day.

Police didn't immediately provide any details of how the women were found but said they appeared to be in good health and had been taken to a hospital to be reunited with relatives and to be evaluated.

On a recorded 911 call Monday, Berry declared, "I'm Amanda Berry. I've been on the news for the last 10 years."

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Israeli airstrikes in Syria send broader message to Iran

BEIRUT (AP) — From Israel's perspective, its airstrikes near Damascus were more about Iran than Syria: Tehran's shipment of guided missiles destroyed in the weekend attacks would have posed a potent threat had the weapons reached Iranian proxy Hezbollah in Lebanon.

While Israel says it has no interest getting involved in the Syrian civil war, it could find itself drawn into the conflict if Syrian leader Bashar Assad's Iranian patrons continue to use his territory to ship arms to Hezbollah.

Repeated Israeli strikes would almost certainly prompt Syrian retaliation, yielding a nightmare scenario in which Israel finds itself in a Syrian morass teeming with jihadi rebels, sectarian hatred and chemical weapons.

For the West, it offers another compelling argument that the Syrian war must somehow be brought to an end.

Since the uprising in Syria began in March 2011, Israel has carefully avoided taking sides.

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10 Things to Know for Tuesday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Tuesday:

1. ISRAELI AIRSTRIKE SENDS MESSAGE NOT JUST IN MIDEAST

For the West, the attack offers another compelling argument that the Syrian war must be brought to an end.

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Marathon bomb suspect's mom wants body returned to Russia; funeral director has burial offers

BOSTON (AP) — A Massachusetts funeral director said Monday he has received burial offers from out-of-state cemeteries for the body of a Boston Marathon bombing suspect who was killed in a gun battle with police, even as Tamerlan Tsarnaev's mother told him she wants the body returned to Russia.

But Worcester funeral home director Peter Stefan said despite the request, he doesn't think Russia will take Tsarnaev's body and he is working on other arrangements. He declined to be more specific.

Meanwhile, a friend of the surviving suspect in the bombings was released from federal custody Monday amid a swell of support from family and friends, but was under strict house arrest and only allowed to leave his home to meet with lawyers and for true emergencies. Also, the administrator of the One Fund Boston released the protocol for payouts of the fund, with the families of those who lost loved ones and individuals who suffered double amputations or permanent brain damage in the bombings receiving the highest payments.

The question of where Tamerlan Tsarnaev will be buried dragged on for another day, and the issue seemed far from resolved.

Stefan said he plans to ask for a burial in the city of Cambridge, where Tsarnaev lived. Cambridge has asked him not to do so.

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As debate swirls around Boston suspect's body, examples of burials for notorious criminals

Whether it's a genocidal dictator or a gunman behind a mass shooting, debate often flares over where the notorious should be laid to rest. Concerns about gravesite vandalism, possible backlash from the public and some sites becoming shrines often lead to burials cloaked in secrecy. In Massachusetts, controversy is surrounding where to bury Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

Here's a look at how some of history's most well-known criminals have been buried over the years:

OSAMA BIN LADEN

Bin Laden, the mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks was buried at sea after Navy SEALs killed him in a 2011 raid on his compound in Pakistan.

U.S. officials said the al-Qaida leader's body was handled according to Islamic practice and tradition, which calls for the body to be buried within 24 hours.

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Limo driver: Deadly fire took just 3 minutes to become inferno, claim lives of 5 women

REDWOOD CITY, Calif. (AP) — First came the tapping. Over the blasting music, limo driver Orville Brown heard someone in the backseat knock on the partition behind him, saying something about smoke. No smoking allowed, he told the crowd of partying women.

Then the taps turned to urgent knocks, and someone screamed "Smoke, smoke" and "Pull over!"

In just a few fleeting moments, five of the women celebrating a girls' night out were killed by flames that overtook the luxury car with terrifying speed.

As smoke thickened in the passenger compartment, Brown pulled the white stretch limo to a stop on a bridge over San Francisco Bay and started pulling women out through the partition that separated him from his passengers.

Three good Samaritans, including a firefighter, stopped to help. The first woman who got out ran to the back and yanked open a door, but Brown said it was already too late.

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Senate passes bill letting states tax Internet purchases, siding with traditional retailers

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate sided with traditional retailers and financially strapped state and local governments Monday by passing a bill that would widely subject online shopping — for many a largely tax-free frontier — to state sales taxes.

The Senate passed the bill by a vote of 69 to 27, getting support from Republicans and Democrats alike. But opposition from some conservatives who view it as a tax increase will make it a tougher sell in the House. President Barack Obama has conveyed his support for the measure.

Under current law, states can only require retailers to collect sales taxes if the store has a physical presence in the state.

That means big retailers with stores all over the country like Wal-Mart, Best Buy and Target collect sales taxes when they sell goods over the Internet. But online retailers like eBay and Amazon don't have to collect sales taxes, except in states where they have offices or distribution centers.

As a result, many online sales are tax-free, giving Internet retailers an advantage over brick-and-mortar stores.

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Philippine volcano erupts with rocks and ash, killing 4 climbers and trapping more near crater

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — One of the Philippines' most active volcanoes spewed huge rocks and ash early Tuesday after a 3-year calm, killing four climbers and trapping others near the crater, officials said.

Rescue teams were sent to Mayon volcano in the central Philippines to look for four climbers and guides trapped after the mild eruption, Albay provincial Gov. Joey Salceda said. Clouds have cleared over the volcano, which was quiet later in the morning.

The four climbers who died were struck by huge rocks, guide Kenneth Jesalva told ABS-CBN TV network by cellphone from a camp near the crater. Another man was critically injured from a group of eight that included five foreigners and three Filipino guides.

One of those killed was Filipino. The nationalities of the foreign climbers were not immediately clear. No bodies have been retrieved yet.

Jesalva said he was in the group that spent the night on the picturesque mountain, known for its almost-perfect cone, when the volcano rumbled back to life early in the morning and rocks "as big as a living room" came raining down on them. He rushed back to the base camp to call for help.

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Bugged by the billions: East Coast about to see power of big numbers in coming cicada invasion

WASHINGTON (AP) — Any day now, billions of cicadas with bulging red eyes will crawl out of the earth after 17 years underground and overrun the East Coast. The insects will arrive in such numbers that people from North Carolina to Connecticut will be outnumbered roughly 600-to-1. Maybe more.

Scientists even have a horror-movie name for the infestation: Brood II. But as ominous as that sounds, the insects are harmless. They won't hurt you or other animals. At worst, they might damage a few saplings or young shrubs. Mostly they will blanket certain pockets of the region, though lots of people won't ever see them.

"It's not like these hordes of cicadas suck blood or zombify people," says May Berenbaum, a University of Illinois entomologist.

They're looking for just one thing: sex. And they've been waiting quite a long time.

Since 1996, this group of 1-inch bugs, in wingless nymph form, has been a few feet underground, sucking on tree roots and biding their time. They will emerge only when the ground temperature reaches precisely 64 degrees. After a few weeks up in the trees, they will die and their offspring will go underground, not to return until 2030.

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Beyonce, Cyrus, Hathaway dress with an edge to embrace punk theme at Met Gala

NEW YORK (AP) — Miley Cyrus, Anne Hathaway and Cameron Diaz were among the celebrities to embrace the punk theme at Monday night's Met gala, the fundraiser at the Metropolitan Museum of Art that's affectionately known as "the party of the year." But Beyonce, the event's honorary chairwoman, seemed the event's grand dame on the red carpet that might rival the Oscars in celebrity wattage.

Wearing a flame-motif gown with long gloves and a long train by Givenchy's Riccardo Tisci, Beyonce was one of the last arrivals, following in the studded heel footsteps of Katy Perry, Taylor Swift, Jennifer Lawrence and Jennifer Lopez.

Many stars embraced the big Costume Institute exhibit they were there to celebrate: "Punk: From Chaos to Couture." Beyonce's co-chairs for the event included Tisci, who escorted Rooney Mara, who wore a white lace gown with exaggerated shoulders and a heavy-hardware zip front.

Mara said she never went through a punk fashion phase but "I was definitely a punk."

Tisci also dressed Kim Kardashian, who has seen much of her maternity wardrobe reviewed — almost always negatively — on social media on a daily basis. The online critics have more fodder with her floral-print, high-neck gown.

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