More Associated Press Articles

  • Ukrainian prime minister announces resignation

    Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk has announced his resignation following turmoil in government.

  • Senate panel backs Robert McDonald for Veterans Affairs secretary

    The Senate Veterans Affairs Committee has unanimously endorsed former Procter & Gamble CEO Robert McDonald to be the new secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

  • Unions, Chris Christie clashing again

    Gov. Chris Christie's summertime talks with residents in beach communities starting Tuesday come with a theme that has some of his biggest critics riled up anew.

  • Health officials crack down on Medicaid marketing

    Florida has banned health insurance companies from marketing their plans directly to Medicaid recipients as the state rolls out its massive plan to privatize its health insurance program for low-income individuals and the disabled.

  • Judge declines to add defendants to pension case

    A Superior Court judge has turned down the state's request to add municipal governments, school districts and scores of other defendants to a lawsuit that challenges the 2011 overhaul of Rhode Island's pension system.

  • Douglas County retirees lose health plan challenge

    Douglas County is not obligated to contribute the same amount to retiree health plans as it does for active employees, the Nebraska Supreme Court has ruled.

  • Tom Corbett seeks to change view of education record

    Since 2011, Pennsylvania Democrats have pointed to the budget-balancing cuts in education aid that GOP Gov. Tom Corbett signed six months into office. And there's evidence voters are listening: A recent independent voter poll found that the single biggest factor behind voter disapproval of...

  • GOP hopefuls differ on how to rein in state budget in Minnesota

    On its current trajectory, Minnesota's next two-year state budget will top the $40 billion mark. The Republicans seeking to defeat Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton say they would slam the brakes on spending if they're put in charge.

  • Some Native Americans wary about health reform

    Denise Mesteth signed up for new health insurance through the federal Affordable Care Act, despite concerns that it may not be worth the money for her and other Native Americans who otherwise rely on free government coverage.

  • Foster children become focus of California schools

    California is embarking on a first-of-its-kind attempt to improve the academic lives of foster youth by giving schools more money to meet their special learning and emotional needs and holding educators and administrators accountable.

  • Got a rash? iPad, other devices might be the cause

    Unexplained rash? Check your iPad. It turns out the popular tablet computer may contain nickel, one of the most common allergy-inducing metals.

  • Spoonfuls can lead to medicine errors, study finds

    The song says a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, but a study says that kind of imprecise measurement can lead to potentially dangerous dosing mistakes.

  • U.S. jails struggle with role as makeshift asylums

    The numbers, posted daily on the Cook County sheriff's website, would be alarming at an urgent care clinic, let alone a jail: On a Wednesday, 36 percent of all new arrivals report having a mental illness. On a Friday, it's 54 percent.

  • Tom Corbett veto exposes GOP divisions in Harrisburg

    The relationship between Gov. Tom Corbett and his fellow Republicans in the Legislature took a turn toward the dysfunctional this week as they traded insults about leadership following his decision to veto millions from the General Assembly's budget.

  • Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley looking at all possibilities on revenue

    Gov. Robert Bentley's opposition to new state taxes during his first term could change in a second term.



From the Weekly Standard

  • For GOP, a Good Crop of Senate Candidates

    Republicans have distinct advantages in Senate races this year, including President Obama’s low job ratings, the number of vulnerable Democrats, and an unhappy national mood. But there’s...

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  • How to Play a Weak Hand in Iraq

    Iraqi prime minister Nuri al-Maliki knows what he wants: a third term in office for himself and U.S. military help in defeating ISIS (now the Islamic State). Political reconciliation between...

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  • The Ethics of Food and Drink

    Should the law compel nursing homes to starve certain Alzheimer’s patients to death? This is not an alarmist fantasy, but a real question, soon to be forced by advocates of ever-wider...

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