News Summary: Clear format dispels 'Hobbit' magic

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Photo -   FILE - This film image released by Warner Bros., shows Ian McKellen as Gandalf in a scene from the fantasy adventure "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey." Filmmaker Peter Jackson's decision to shoot his epic three-part J.R.R. Tolkien prequel in the super-clear format that boosts the number of frames per second to 48 from the current standard, 24, has some unintended consequences. (AP Photo/Warner Bros., James Fisher, File)
FILE - This film image released by Warner Bros., shows Ian McKellen as Gandalf in a scene from the fantasy adventure "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey." Filmmaker Peter Jackson's decision to shoot his epic three-part J.R.R. Tolkien prequel in the super-clear format that boosts the number of frames per second to 48 from the current standard, 24, has some unintended consequences. (AP Photo/Warner Bros., James Fisher, File)
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FAST FRAME: Peter Jackson's three-part epic based on "The Hobbit" was shot in 48 frames per second, a format that doubles the rate used for decades. It provides less blur and more clarity.

TOO REAL? Some critics have found the image is so crisp that some of the artifice of moviemaking becomes apparent. One cinematographer thinks it's better for real-life settings, rather than fantastic ones.

BROADER PALETTE: Other filmmakers like James Cameron are eyeing the format, which has become easier in the digital age. Cameron may shoot at 60 frames per second for the "Avatar" sequels.

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