Opinion

Op-Ed: Commemorating 40 Years of Roe v. Wade

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Opinion,Op-Eds

Forty years ago, the Supreme Court issued a decision that altered the character of our nation. Since 1973, the United States has suffered the loss of roughly 50 million people -- our brothers, sisters, neighbors and friends -- at the hands of Roe v. Wade.

The pitting of women against their children in the womb through abortion on demand, up to the moment of birth, has taken its toll. Americans are weary of it. Hope for a restoration of culture, against a culture of death, lies in the continually increasing number of young pro-life men and women in America.

And in recent weeks, even pro-abortion rights leaders and the mainstream media have noticed the booming pro-life resistance.

Nancy Keenan, on her way out the door at NARAL Pro-Choice America, explained the situation well last year, noting the "intensity gap" when it comes to abortion and young people. The reality is this: Americans across the board, and particularly the younger generation, are increasingly identifying as pro-life and more likely to support the pro-life laws that groups like NARAL and their cohorts oppose.

It's not hard to understand why America's youth reject the extreme position shared by Keenan, President Obama and the abortion lobby. So committed has this group become to abortion at any stage for any reason that they refuse to support even the limits that overwhelming majorities embrace.

Last year, congressional Democrats and abortion-business interest groups refused to support a ban on sex-selection abortion as well as late-term abortions past the point at which unborn children are known to feel pain. Never mind that national polling shows these regulations are supported by an astounding 77 and 63 percent of Americans, respectively -- with support even higher among women.

When it comes to taxpayer funding of abortion, 72 percent of Americans are opposed -- a fact that pro-abortion politicians try hard to obscure. The Democratic Party, which once operated under the premise that abortion should be "safe, legal, and rare," has dropped "rare" and "safe" in pressing for unregulated taxpayer-funded abortions for all.

As a state senator, Barack Obama, already a star in abortion-rights circles, voted four times to deny legal protections to children born alive after failed abortions. Obama preferred to leave the fate of these children to the abortionist who, only moments before, had sought to kill them.

In the age of 3-D ultrasounds, young people see behind the disguising rhetoric of "choice" and "rights" a heartless justification for 3,400 unborn children dying every day in our country, and 3,400 suffering mothers. Having seen their prematurely born brothers and sisters nursed to health and grow outside the womb through progress in perinatal care, America's youth see the humanity of the unborn child, no matter how small. They increasingly recognize abortion as an injustice. They have seen abortion bring not equality and liberation, but hurt and suffering to their mothers, aunts, sisters and friends.

Their fresh witness to the miracle and beauty of life enables them to hear the inner voice that hardened pro-abortion activists try so hard to mute. Intensity on the pro-life side -- as with most movements on the right side of history -- will not diminish anytime soon. One election result will not deter champions of the vulnerable.

Pro-abortion-rights leaders are fighting against the tide, and their recent shift shows they do so with sobriety. Last week, Planned Parenthood, America's No. 1 abortion merchant, rolled out a new strategy to recast labels like "pro-choice," and "pro-life." While well-financed political strategy and tactics may help deflect the pro-life advantage, the abortion rights movement cannot focus-group itself into a position of moral strength and human rights leadership. The movement is on the wrong side of history. Real life and four decades of legal abortion have damaged irreparably the "abortion" brand.

As the Gallup organization puts it, pro-life is "the new normal." Youth, lead on.

Marjorie Dannenfelser is president of the Susan B. Anthony List, a nationwide network of more than 365,000 pro-life Americans dedicated to reducing and ultimately ending abortion by advancing, mobilizing and representing pro-life women in the political process.

Marjorie Dannenfelser is president of the Susan B. Anthony List, a nationwide network of more than 365,000 pro-life Americans dedicated to reducing and ultimately ending abortion by advancing, mobilizing and representing pro-life women in the political process.

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