Topics: National News

Report: Systemic failures led to Benghazi attacks

|
Photo - FILE - This Sept 13, 2012 file photo shows a Libyan man investigating the inside of the  U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. The Senate Intelligence Committee released a report on the deadly assault on the diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, laying blame on the State Department, the late Ambassador Chris Stevens and the intelligence community for failing to communicate and heed warnings of terrorist activity in the area and protect diplomatic facilities. The highly critical report also says the U.S. military was not positioned to aid the Americans in need, though the head of Africa Command had offered military security teams that Stevens _ who was killed in the attack _ had rejected weeks before the attack. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon, File)
FILE - This Sept 13, 2012 file photo shows a Libyan man investigating the inside of the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. The Senate Intelligence Committee released a report on the deadly assault on the diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, laying blame on the State Department, the late Ambassador Chris Stevens and the intelligence community for failing to communicate and heed warnings of terrorist activity in the area and protect diplomatic facilities. The highly critical report also says the U.S. military was not positioned to aid the Americans in need, though the head of Africa Command had offered military security teams that Stevens _ who was killed in the attack _ had rejected weeks before the attack. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon, File)
News,Nation

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan Senate report on the 2012 attacks on the diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, say systemic failure of security for U.S. diplomats overseas led to the deaths of the ambassador to Libya and three other Americans.

The report says the intelligence community didn't send enough warnings, the State Department didn't take the warnings it did get seriously enough and the military was caught flat-footed when called on to rescue those in need.

The report released Wednesday by the Senate Intelligence Committee says the attacks could have been prevented if the State Department had accepted security on offer from the military or had closed the Benghazi facility until it could have been better secured.

View article comments Leave a comment