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Revolution: Ron Paul's call for populist uprising, gold standard, gets top movie billing

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White House,Movies,Paul Bedard,Washington Secrets,Ron Paul

The Ron Paul “Revolution” is making its debut in a new political thriller about what happens when the federal government loses control of the economy and foreign policy and is met with a second American revolt.

"Alongside Night," an independent film being shown to small audience around the nation, features the libertarian folk hero cheering a return to the gold standard and railing against an out-of-control government, and a star in Kevin Sorbo who echoes many of Paul's themes of the past 20 years.

Sorbo, who plays free-market economist "Martin Vreeland" in the movie, "encapsulates a lot of the ideas that Ron Paul is talking about," said J. Neil Schulman, who directed the movie based on his book and screenplay.

Schulman, who describes his movie and book as a “near-future political thriller,” shows a nation tired of tyrannical rule from a gun-grabbing government. "The fictional premise," he said, is that "the American people will remember the founding principles enough for form an underground to resist."

The movie, distributed to viewing groups through Tugg.com, sounds many of the alarms some Americans see today. “We've seen a regression to a lot of the worst traits that the American revolution was fighting against, oppressive government, arrest without warrant, detention without trial. The bill of rights was specifically supposed to prevent this sort of thing and hasn't,” Schulman told Secrets.

“This is a movie that kind of points out where we are headed right now,” added Sorbo on Ed Morrissey's Hot Air show. Sorbo starred in "Hercules" and "God's Not Dead."

Paul’s part in the movie comes in a news clip during which he warned about the currency collapsing. “He presciently is talking about the currency being vulnerable and could collapse at any time and is just the perfect thing in that moment of the movie when the character retrieves gold,” said Schulman.

He said that Hollywood took a pass on the movie, despite the popularity of revolution movies. But he also noted that "God’s Not Dead" was an independent movie also and it made $60 million.

Paul Bedard, the Washington Examiner's "Washington Secrets" columnist, can be contacted at pbedard@washingtonexaminer.com.