Policy: Environment & Energy

Sandy stormproofing ideas coming from residents

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Photo - In this March 18, 2014 photo, Darlene Greene, left, reviews maps of Toms River N.J. that show flooding damage from Superstorm Sandy with Jeff Coley, center, and Jo-Ann Herbst. They were at a hearing at the Toms River municipal building for residents to make suggestions on how to protect against future storms. Ideas included building dunes, adding bulkheading, better securing boats and floating docks, and monitoring the slope of homeowners' properties to avoid channeling water into low-lying areas. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)
In this March 18, 2014 photo, Darlene Greene, left, reviews maps of Toms River N.J. that show flooding damage from Superstorm Sandy with Jeff Coley, center, and Jo-Ann Herbst. They were at a hearing at the Toms River municipal building for residents to make suggestions on how to protect against future storms. Ideas included building dunes, adding bulkheading, better securing boats and floating docks, and monitoring the slope of homeowners' properties to avoid channeling water into low-lying areas. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)
News,Business,New Jersey,Energy and Environment,Hurricane Sandy

TOMS RIVER, N.J. (AP) — Jersey shore communities hit hard by Superstorm Sandy are turning to their residents for ideas on how to guard against the next big storm.

At public meetings, in volunteer committees and in an online survey, residents have suggested building bulkheads, installing flood valves, rebuilding dunes and even tying down boats and docks more securely.

Toms River held a series of meetings for residents of hard-hit neighborhoods.

Sea Bright had 50 volunteers come up with 15 rebuilding projects.

Belmar and Lake Como residents weighed in on ways to reduce flooding at a lake near the beach.

And a Rutgers University professor is surveying residents of Highlands, Sea Bright and Sayreville on what they want their rebuilt communities to look like.

This is part of a periodic series about the New Jersey shore's efforts to rebuild and return to normalcy in the second summer after Superstorm Sandy ravaged many coastal communities.

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