Saturday, March 30, 2013

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News,Science and Technology

ST. PETER, Minn. (AP) — An exhibit commemorating the Dakota-U.S. war of 1862 is heading to the Smithsonian Institute.

The 12-panel exhibit depicts a range of events, beginning from when the native Americans and settlers first met and culminating with their recent efforts to reconcile, the Mankato Free Press reported (http://bit.ly/114KDashttp://bit.ly/114KDas ).

The six-week war took place in southern Minnesota and resulted in the hanging of 38 Dakota in Mankato.

"Commemorating Controversy: The Dakota-U.S. War of 1862" was created by the Nicollet County Historical Society and students and faculty at Gustavus Adolphus College.

"We're really excited the Smithsonian is going to host it," said Ben Leonard, who runs the historical society.

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MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Pro football Hall of Famer and Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Alan Page has written a children's book about his odd pinky, a finger that's permanently bent outward at a 90-degree angle.

The book, which will be released next week, is called "Alan and His Perfectly Pointy, Impossibly Perpendicular Pinky," KARE-TV reported (http://kare11.tv/X4uTTehttp://kare11.tv/X4uTTe ).

The former NFL MVP says children always want to know what happened to the finger.

"It does make a good story," said Page, who decided the story would be good enough to read about. He and his daughter, Kamie Page, wrote the book to help raise money for the Page Education Foundation, which has helped thousands of kids attend college over the last 25 years.

The pinky has been dislocated and reset several times. Page recalled one game when he showed his injured pinky to Vikings teammate Jim Marshall.

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DULUTH, Minn. (AP) — A University of Minnesota physics lab has recorded its first three-dimensional image of a key subatomic particle. It's part of research that scientists hope will give them a better understanding of the universe.

A Duluth News Tribune report (http://bit.ly/XPdhbhhttp://bit.ly/XPdhbh ) says the 14,000-ton NOvA particle detector near River Ash is being built to study neutrinos. The lab is part of an international collaboration to study the elusive particles, which have little or no mass, no electrical charge and tend not to interact with other matter.

Marvin Marshak is the lab's director and a professor in the school of physics and astronomy. He says it's exciting to see the first tangible results come in.

Studying neutrinos could help scientists learn how the universe was created and how our sun is powered.

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HAWLEY, Minn. (AP) — Clay County authorities have identified the victim of a fatal small-plane crash as Kevin Ferris of Duluth.

The Forum of Fargo, N.D., (http://bit.ly/10n5phzhttp://bit.ly/10n5phz ) reports the 48-year-old was traveling from Superior, Wis., to Moorhead on Friday morning to visit his parents for Easter weekend. He was found dead after his plane crashed about four miles south of Hawley.

Sheriff Bill Bergquist says a search plane spotted the wreckage Friday afternoon.

Bergquist says Ferris may have tried to land the single-engine, two-seat Cessna plane because of fog.

The victim's girlfriend, Roz Randorf, says Ferris always wanted to be a pilot. She says he began flying two years ago.

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