More Budgets and Deficits Articles

  • Toyota pledges $1M toward Detroit bankruptcy deal

    DETROIT (AP) — Toyota has pledged $1 million toward the Detroit Institute of Arts' goal to raise $100 million to prevent the sale of art in Detroit's bankruptcy and help city pensioners. The announcement was made Wednesday by the museum and Toyota Motor North America. Simon Nagata, president...

  • Money allocated for fighting fires to run out

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service will soon have to scale back some projects designed to help prevent wildfires so that it can meet the expenses of fighting this summer's round of fires. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said Tuesday that about $400 million to $500 million in projects...

  • Poll: Americans diverge on how to pay for highways

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of Americans think the economic benefits of good transportation outweigh the cost to taxpayers, but they can't agree on how to pay for new highways or repairs of old ones, according to a new Associated Press-GfKpoll. Six in 10 people surveyed said the cost of good...

  • Transportation tax tops Missouri primary ballot

    A Missouri primary that lacks competition for the only statewide office on the ballot nonetheless has generated considerable attention because of proposals seeking to raise taxes for transportation and create constitutional protections for farmers.

  • Meeting doesn't solve Philly school funding crisis

    A meeting Monday of top Republican legislative leaders and Gov. Tom Corbett produced little progress toward freeing a stalled tax bill that Philadelphia officials say is critical to opening the city's schools on time.

  • Feds grant Florida 3-year Medicaid renewal

    The federal government has granted a three-year renewal of Florida's Medicaid managed care program.

  • North Carolina legislature in limbo without adjournment plan

    The North Carolina House and Senate spent weeks this summer unable to agree on a state budget. Now their inability to agree on how to adjourn could leave this year's session in more confusion.

  • Newsflash! Medicare is still going bankrupt, and taking Uncle Sam with it

    It's becoming a ritual. Medicare trustees release an annual report projecting bankruptcy at some point in the not-so-distant future. And America yawns.

  • Firm running California federal charity drive misspent millions in donations, including buying a house

    At least half of the $4 million in expenses claimed by the California arm of the federal government's workplace charity campaign was spent on inappropriate or unknown items, according to a government watchdog report.

  • Florida utility asks for OK to pass on nuclear charges

    JUNO BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Florida Power & Light Co. is asking the state to allow it to charge customers for costs related to two proposed nuclear reactors. It's the seventh straight year FPL is making such a request to the Florida Public Service Commission. Under the proposal going before...

  • Here's what Senate Democrats plan to say about the cost of climate change

    Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray circulated a memo Friday outlining talking points for Democrats to use about how climate change affects federal spending and budgeting.

  • Congress passes highway bill hours before deadline

    After several delays, Congress voted late Thursday to keep federal highway money flowing to states just hours ahead of a midnight deadline.

  • What you should know about the federal highway bill

    With Congress poised this week to pass a temporary measure to fund road, transit and rail programs, it likely will have a greater direct impact on Americans than most congressional initiatives this year.

  • The months around the government shutdown posted the best economic growth of the recovery

    Last year's government shutdown coincided with the strongest economic growth of the economic recovery, data released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis Wednesday show.

  • Four reasons Congress may not pass the border bill before recess

    Though both Democrats and Republicans in Congress want to address the recent influx of unaccompanied minors at the southern border before the August recess starts, a deal looks farther away than ever.



From the Weekly Standard