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More Budgets and Deficits Articles

  • Congress should crack down on itself, not on Burger King

    A simple change in how its members can hold their wealth is far a more promising reform than the fool's errand of sniping at formerly American companies as they flee.

  • Obamacare to wreak havoc during tax season

    As many as 85 percent of Americans who signed up for Obamacare plans are receiving some sort of federal subsidies, putting them at financial risk down the road if their incomes are different than what they first estimated.

  • White House has 'no idea' whether government will shut down

    "It would be a real shame if Republicans engaged in an effort to shut down the government over a common-sense solution [on immigration]," White House press secretary Josh Earnest said.

  • Regulators OK overhaul of credit rating agencies

    The Securities and Exchange Commission voted to adopt two rules intended to prevent weak or fraudulent loans from being bundled into securities and sold to investors, including an overhaul of the way that rating agencies work.

  • National debt has doubled since financial crisis: budget office

    This year the federal debt will be double what it was before the financial crisis, Congress' budget scorekeeper projected Wednesday morning.

  • Mortgage rules leave lenders scared to lend

    Federal rules are scaring home lenders from making loans to anyone without excellent credit, a dynamic that top economic policymakers say is holding back the nation's economic recovery.

  • Paul Ryan: Limit home mortgage deduction to the middle class

    Rep. Paul Ryan said in an interview on Monday that he favors limiting the home mortgage tax deduction to "middle income people" but opposes curbing deductions for contributions to charity.

  • The Obama bank shakedown

    The Bank of America settlement "highlights a pattern of the government extorting the banks," said a former Wells Fargo CEO, and he's absolutely right.

  • VIDEO: Ed Gillespie pushes tax cuts during Northern Virginia campaign swing

    Virginia Republican candidate for Senate Ed Gillespie pushed the need to lower the corporate tax rate to 25 percent Monday.

  • The White House hates tax inversions but won't criticize Burger King

    The White House resisted a chance Monday to denounce Burger King for potentially relocating its headquarters to Canada as part of a possible purchase of doughnut and coffee chain Tim Hortons, even though President Obama has repeatedly ripped such corporate moves.

  • Job No. 1 for the next Pennsylvania governor? A huge budget gap

    Job No. 1 for whoever wins this fall's election for Pennsylvania governor likely will be trying to solve the state government's messy fiscal situation.

  • Janet Yellen's calculation of when to end the Federal Reserve's stimulus is changing

    The Fed chairwoman, speaking Friday at a conference of top central bankers in Jackson Hole, Wyo., acknowledged that the Fed is nearing a tipping point in its calculation between tightening monetary policy at the risk of creating more unemployment and keeping money too loose for too long.

  • Obamacare rates are rising once again

    Obama didn't promise that he would overhaul the health care system so that premiums would continue to increase each year, just as they did in the system that existed before he was elected, which he argued was unacceptable.

  • Treasury looks to stop 'corporate deserters' on its own

    President Obama may not be able to stop "corporate deserters" from taking up legal residency in low-tax countries. But it appears that his Treasury Department will try to make the prospect of leaving the U.S. as unattractive as possible.

  • Bank of America settles for record $17 billion in mortgage inquiry

    The Department of Justice said that it would be the single largest settlement with a U.S. business in history. The agreement includes $9.65 billion in cash paid out to federal and state agencies, and nearly $7 billion in consumer relief to borrowers hurt by the mortgage crisis.



From the Weekly Standard