More Energy and Environment Articles

  • Labor Dept. cuts levels of allowable coal dust

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration said Wednesday it is cutting the amount of coal dust allowed in coal mines in an effort to help reduce black lung disease. "Today we advance a very basic principle: you shouldn't have to sacrifice your life for your livelihood," Labor Secretary...

  • Energy Department scraps millions in fees for nuclear loan guarantee

    Developers of a Georgia nuclear project didn't have to pay millions of dollars in fees designed to prevent risk for taxpayers when it secured $6.5 billion in loan guarantees from the Energy Department in February, the agency confirmed Tuesday to the Washington Examiner. The DOE calculated a...

  • Muskegon utility hopes for new use of closed plant

    MUSKEGON, Mich. (AP) — Consumers Energy is committed to helping find a new use for the site of a coal-fired power plant in western Michigan that's scheduled to close in two years, officials with the utility said. The unit of Jackson-based CMS Energy Corp. offered updates Tuesday on plans to...

  • Google, SunPower team up on solar energy program

    MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — Google Inc. and SunPower Corp. are planning to invest up to $250 million to lease solar panels to homeowners, the companies said on Wednesday. Google is investing up to $100 million, while solar panel maker SunPower is committing the other $150 million. Some...

  • Sherpas leave Everest; some expeditions nix climbs

    KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Dozens of Sherpa guides packed up their tents and left Mount Everest's base camp Wednesday, after the deaths of 16 of their colleagues in an avalanche exposed an undercurrent of resentment by Sherpas over their pay, treatment and benefits. With the entire climbing...

  • Fracking debate may decide Colorado elections in 2014

    “You know, slavery had a lot of economic benefits, but it had an ethical problem.” That was anti-fracking activist Weston Wilson on Monday pushing a ban on hydraulic fracturing in Colorado by asserting that oil and gas development is equivalent to slavery.

  • Climate change likely to make Everest even riskier

    NEW DELHI (AP) — Climbing to the roof of the world is becoming less predictable and possibly more dangerous, scientists say, as climate change brings warmer temperatures that may eat through the ice and snow on Mount Everest. Nepal was left reeling when a sudden ice avalanche slammed down...

  • MSNBC host Chris Hayes pens radical 'climate justice' manifesto

    "What the climate justice movement is demanding is the ultimate abolition of fossil fuels," writes MSNBC's Chris Hayes in a lengthy new call for action against global warming.

  • Duke: Moving coal ash would cost up to $10 billion

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Duke Energy told North Carolina lawmakers Tuesday that removing all of the company's coal ash away from the state's rivers and lakes would take decades and cost up to $10 billion, with its electricity customers likely footing nearly all the bill. In a presentation to a...

  • Obama visits Oso after deadly mudslide

    President Obama on Tuesday visited the town of Oso, Wash., which was hit by a devastating mudslide and assured the town's residents that the nation would do everything it could to help them recover.

  • Southern Oregon farmers divided on GMO bans

    GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — Southern Oregon farmers are choosing sides in a pair of local campaigns to ban genetically modified crops. Ban supporters say pollen from fields of genetically modified organisms can contaminate organic farms, and they are worried about use of the herbicide Roundup,...

  • BLM says 6 cattle died in disputed Nevada roundup

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Six animals died in a federal roundup of cattle that officials say rancher Cliven Bundy allowed to graze illegally for 20 years on public land outside his southern Nevada property, the Bureau of Land Management said Tuesday. Four animals were euthanized, including one cow and...

  • Spring corn planting still sputters in key states

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — At a time most years when farmers would be in full swing of planting corn, Stanley Blunier and most other growers near his central Illinois farm still hadn't begun the annual ritual on Tuesday because fields simply are too wet or too cold to be receptive to fragile seeds....

  • Expanded don't-call list, fuel protections advance

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — An expanded "do-not-call" registry that includes text messaging and new protections for heating oil customers were among several consumer protection bills that cleared the Connecticut Senate on Tuesday and will head to the House for final action. One bill that would add...

  • EPA scales back biofuel mandate to reflect reality

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is significantly reducing the amount of cellulosic biofuels refiners will have to prove they blended into gasoline last year, acknowledging that the market lagged far behind government projections. The EPA on Tuesday said it was basing its 2013...



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Hustle Is Overrated

    The Bryce Harper-Mike Trout showdown is underway and the outcome is, well, inconclusive. In round one Monday night, the Nationals leftfielder walked and went hitless in three at bats while the...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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