Share

More Finance and Banking Articles

  • Elizabeth Warren: Tapes show Fed more concerned with banks than public

    In an interview Wednesday, Warren said the recordings reveal "that the relationship between regulators and the financial institutions they oversee is too cozy to provide the kind of tough oversight that's really needed."

  • Banks spend 37 mil hours on paperwork

    "When you're talking about millions of hours wasted filling out forms, and hundreds of forms you can't submit online, it's sort of shocking," said the study's author, AAF director of regulatory policy Sam Batkins.

  • Activist 'payday lending' video ad misleads consumers, according to advertising ethicists

    An activist group that has been waging an aggressive advertising campaign against "shady tactics" of payday lenders may have misled consumers when it used the logo of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in an advocacy video without the agency's permission.

  • New trial will shine light on 2008 bailout of insurance giant AIG

    Mark Calabria, the director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, said, "I suspect the suspicion that AIG was assisted to help its counter-parties will be reinforced. I suspect we will also learn that the regulators were making Žit all up as they went along."

  • ATM fees keep climbing, survey says

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — The penalty for using an ATM that is not affiliated with your bank rose 5 percent over the past year. The average fee for using an out-of-network ATM climbed to a new high of $4.35 per transaction, according to a survey released Monday by Bankrate.com. That figure includes...

  • Student loans may drag down economy for years

    Soaring levels of student loan debt are not only burdening recent graduates but have created entire generations that aren't able to save and invest, potentially hurting long-term economic growth.

  • World faces slow growth or another crisis, former central bankers warn

    The Geneva Report on the World Economy published Monday notes that, contrary to popular belief, the world is becoming more indebted in the wake of the debt-fueled 2008 financial crisis, not less.

  • New nonprofit seeks to cut off funding for extremist groups

    A new nonprofit that was established Monday seeks to "name and shame" the sources of financing for Islamist extremist groups and bring public pressure to cut them off.

  • IRS paid $5.2 billion in fraudulent refunds

    In a report issued Monday, the GAO said the IRS stopped $24.2 billion in theft, but the extent of the fraud is "unknown."

  • New bank rule would be costly for cities, states

    The liquidity coverage rule would require banks to hold enough safe, liquid assets that would be sellable even in a crisis to fund their operations for at least 30 days.

  • 56 million cards compromised in Home Depot hack

    Home Depot said "criminals used unique, custom-built malware to evade detection" and steal customers' information between April and September.

  • Jury hears arguments in terror finance trial

    NEW YORK (AP) — In a high-stakes legal offshoot of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, a U.S. jury was asked Thursday to decide whether executives at Jordan-based Arab Bank should be held responsible for a wave of suicide bombings in the early 2000s that left several Americans dead or wounded. A...

  • Janet Yellen: Most American families lack savings and are 'extraordinarily vulnerable'

    The Fed chairwoman noted that families are still struggling in the wake of the recession, even though the economy has steadily, if slowly, improved.

  • Attorney says Garlock’s estimation ‘pales in comparison’ to importance of disclosure

    CHARLOTTE, N.C. (Legal Newsline) – With the unsealing process in the Garlock Sealing Technologies bankruptcy proceeding ongoing, attorney Mark Plevin has detailed the importance of access to the protected evidence that led to Bankruptcy Judge George Hodges’ landmark decision. Plevin’s article,...

  • Federal Reserve creates new panel for identifying economic threats

    The Federal Reserve is taking new steps to guard against again being caught by surprise by threats to the financial system.



From the Weekly Standard