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More Joseph Lawler Articles

  • Treasury: New tax changes to stop inversions

    In a highly anticipated executive action, Lew said the Treasury Department was taking "initial steps that we believe will make companies think twice" about moving their headquarters abroad for tax purposes.

  • New bank rule would be costly for cities, states

    The liquidity coverage rule would require banks to hold enough safe, liquid assets that would be sellable even in a crisis to fund their operations for at least 30 days.

  • Obama relies on wishful thinking to avoid debt troubles

    Given the realities of the global environment, it is a far safer bet to assume that the U.S. will be required to spend something closer to the post-war average on national security than the historically low amounts built into Obama administration budget plans.

  • Improving job market complicates push to renew unemployment benefits

    "In December, it was an open-and-shut case" to continue the program, said Michael Strain, an economist at the right-of-center American Enterprise Institute. "At this point, it's a much harder call to make."

  • Democrats introduce bill to tax overseas-profit companies leaving the U.S.

    Senate Democrats are trying to give corporations another reason not to move their headquarters out of the U.S. Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Dick Durbin of Illinois introduced a bill Friday that would make companies pay taxes on their foreign income held abroad before completing tax inversions....

  • GOP heads into midterms without detailed conservative manifesto

    House Speaker John Boehner released a five-point economic plan Thursday that outlined general areas of reform, including cutting spending and reforming taxes. The agenda, however, did not include the detailed legislative proposals that were included in the Pledge to America four years ago.

  • 56 million cards compromised in Home Depot hack

    Home Depot said "criminals used unique, custom-built malware to evade detection" and steal customers' information between April and September.

  • Boehner stresses tax reform, school choice in GOP agenda

    In an abbreviated replay of past Republican pre-election agendas, House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday laid out a plan for the GOP to boost economic growth with a combination of old-school conservative policies such as reforming taxes and cutting spending as well as newer priorities.

  • Paul Ryan: We’re working to change the rules for tax reform

    Ryan, the presumed successor to retiring Ways and Means Committee chairman Dave Camp if the GOP holds the House of Representatives in November, said Thursday that "there are two things that we are working on right now" to help him succeed where Camp fell short in pushing comprehensive tax reform.

  • Janet Yellen: Most American families lack savings and are 'extraordinarily vulnerable'

    The Fed chairwoman noted that families are still struggling in the wake of the recession, even though the economy has steadily, if slowly, improved.

  • Obama's chances to wind down Fannie and Freddie before November slipping away

    Hope for reforming Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac dims as Congress finishes up its business before the November elections, even as administration officials intensify the push to fix housing finance and boost home lending.

  • Treasury secretary promises executive action 'very, very soon' on inversions

    "Any company considering an inversion is now on notice that there is action that’s going to be taken,—� Lew said.

  • Federal Reserve keeps commitment to low rates

    The central bank's monetary policy committee maintained its promise that it would keep short-term interest rates near zero for a "considerable time" in its statement following a two-day meeting Wednesday.

  • Inflation slows in August for third consecutive month

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Wednesday that consumer prices rose 1.7 percent for the year ending in August. The Consumer Price Index fell at a 0.2 percent annual rate in August, adjusted for seasonal variation.

  • New HUD chief: Mortgage credit too tight

    In one of his first speeches as secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Julian Castro joined other members of the Obama administration in warning that it now is too difficult to qualify for a home loan.



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