More Supreme Court Articles

  • Court won't hear Arizona appeal over harboring ban

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court won't hear an appeal from the state of Arizona over a ruling that blocked enforcement of part of Arizona's 2010 immigration law. The justices had no comment Monday on their order declining to review the ruling that barred police from arresting people for...

  • Court won't hear Fla. employee drug testing rule

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has turned away an appeal by Florida Gov. Rick Scott over his plan to require random drug tests for thousands of state workers. The justices on Monday did not comment in rejecting an appeal that sought to allow testing on up to 85,000 employees. A lower...

  • Ex-Supreme Court justice says politics can be factor on retiring

    John Paul Stevens says he thinks it's appropriate for Supreme Court justices to factor in political considerations when weighing a decision to retire. "I think certainly it's natural and an appropriate thing to think about your successor," the retired justice told ABC's "This Week" in an...

  • Ex-justice says politics can be factor on retiring

    WASHINGTON (AP) — John Paul Stevens says he thinks it's appropriate for Supreme Court justices to factor in political considerations when weighing a decision to retire. "I think certainly it's natural and an appropriate thing to think about your successor," the retired justice told ABC's...

  • Supreme Court to address whether campaign lies are a crime

    The Supreme Court is set to address whether the age-old act of political mudslinging and false accusations are a crime, with the fate -- or at least the tone -- of campaign attack ads at stake. The case brings into conflict two deeply held constitutional values: the right of wide open and...

  • Juicy dispute hits Supreme Court

    A juicy case awaits the Supreme Court when it hears oral arguments Monday on a dispute between the Coca-Cola Co. and POM Wonderful LLC, a rival beverage maker over a pomegranate-and blueberry-flavored drink. POM Wonderful sued Coke over the drink's label.

  • Court to weigh challenge to ban on campaign lies

    WASHINGTON (AP) — As political campaigns begin to heat up, the Supreme Court is deciding whether false accusations and mudslinging made during an election can be punished as a crime. Addressing an issue of negative campaigning that now may be a fact of life in American politics, justices will...

  • Man who disrupted Supreme Court gets time served

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A demonstrator who interrupted arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court in February and whose group posted video of the protest online, a first for the court, has been sentenced to time served. Noah Kai Newkirk of Los Angeles pleaded guilty Tuesday in connection with the Feb. 26...

  • Opposing government coercion is true 'price of citizenship'

    When I hear people talk about the Elane Photography case from New Mexico, I am reminded of a sign Jon Stewart held during his television show about restoring civility to public controversies: “I disagree with you, but I'm pretty sure you're not Hitler.” Stewart rightly criticized the...

  • Supreme Court's McCutcheon decision strengthens First Amendment rights

    A big part of politics is getting together with people who agree with you about government and want to do something about it.

  • McCutcheon v. FEC won’t have ‘tremendous impact,’ SMU professor says

    DALLAS (Legal Newsline) – A recent Supreme Court opinion abolishing aggregate political contribution limits will not have a “tremendous impact” on the Texas political landscape, says one political science professor. While critics such as Robert Weissman, president of Public Citizen,...

  • McCutcheon decision shows Supreme Court split on individual free speech versus 'collective voice'

    In its recent ruling in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, the Supreme Court struck down yet another provision of federal campaign finance law as a violation of the First Amendment's free speech guarantee.

  • Sheldon Whitehouse: John Roberts is so partisan, he upheld Obamacare to help Republicans

    Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., argued that Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts upheld Obamacare in order to help Republicans, analysis he offered to buttress the idea that the court's five Republican nominees are partisan jurists.

  • Campaign finance laws show incumbents are well-protected

    The recent Supreme Court decision over-ruling some Federal Election Commission restrictions on political campaign contributions has provoked angry reactions on the Left. That is what often happens whenever the high court rules that the First Amendment means what it says -- free speech for...

  • Business-Industry PAC welcomes Supreme Court's recent campaign finance decision

    WASHINGTON (Legal Newsline) – Business-Industry PAC is applauding the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to strike down overall campaign contribution limits, believing the opinion was the right decision for free enterprise and speech. U.S. Supreme Court On Wednesday, the Supreme Court,...



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Hustle Is Overrated

    The Bryce Harper-Mike Trout showdown is underway and the outcome is, well, inconclusive. In round one Monday night, the Nationals leftfielder walked and went hitless in three at bats while the...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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