More Taxes Articles

  • Obama: Offshore 'tax inversions' are unpatriotic

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama says a loophole that lets companies dodge U.S. taxes by moving their headquarters overseas is unpatriotic. Obama is denouncing "tax inversions" in his weekly radio and Internet address. He says companies are essentially renouncing their citizenship to...

  • Let low-income Americans opt out of Social Security

    America is supposed to be the land of the free and the home of the brave. But as we become bogged down in our many problems, I see, unfortunately, a mentality in which we are becoming increasingly a nation of the unfree – the victim – and the timid, in how we’re approaching these...

  • House votes to boost child tax credit for some

    WASHINGTON (AP) — More families with higher incomes could claim the popular child tax credit under a bill that won approval Friday in the House. But in a dispute that divides Republicans and Democrats, millions of the poorest low-income families would still lose the credit in 2018, when...

  • Big Ideas: On homelessness, strippers and 3D printing

    With inadequate housing or shelter options, many homeless people are forced to live out of doors and in public places.

  • Eliminating marriage penalty in family tax issues, simplifying education credits just makes good sense

    There are countless blessings for those starting a family, but the financial responsibility can be a challenge for any working parents.

  • Here's where President Obama assigns the blame for corporate 'inversions'

    President Obama placed the blame for the recent rush of U.S. companies to overseas tax jurisdictions squarely on congressional inaction Thursday, saying that "Congress is just not productive."

  • 10 ways Obama tries to sound populist

    Obama has deployed a variety of catch phrases -- with mixed results -- to brandish his populist credentials. Here are the 10 that have gained the most traction.

  • Senate bill targets companies that move overseas

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate voted Wednesday to advance an election-year bill limiting tax breaks for U.S. companies that move operations overseas. But big hurdles remain. The Senate voted 93-7 to begin debating the bill, which would prevent companies from deducting expenses related to moving...

  • Would the last person leaving blue Maryland please turn out the lights?

    At least 160 Marylanders are about to lose their jobs because of the constitutional myopia of the state's corrupt liberal Democratic establishment. It's a sad illustration of the dire results of one-party rule.

  • Credit Suisse in steep loss after US tax case

    GENEVA (AP) — Credit Suisse, Switzerland's second-biggest bank, posted a second-quarter net loss of 700 million Swiss francs ($779 million) Tuesday after paying the largest penalty ever imposed in a U.S. criminal tax case. The steep loss contrasted sharply with the profit of 1.045 billion...

  • Big Ideas: On basketball, prisons and Kansas

    Do some people think taxes don't affect economic choices? If so, they should talk to Trevor Ariza and the Washington Wizards.

  • Another warning that a national debt crisis is looming

    It's no longer popular in Washington these days to discuss the nation's long-term debt problem, but a report released on Tuesday by the Congressional Budget Office provided a stark reminder that a looming crisis is approaching, and the longer the nation waits to address it, the more difficult it...

  • Manhattan Moment: Professional licenses, not taxes, are the biggest barriers to small business creation

    What is the biggest challenge faced by small businesses today? Surprisingly the answer is not high taxes — it is professional licensing requirements.

  • Orrin Hatch takes on Treasury's Jack Lew over 'economic patriotism'

    Sen. Orrin Hatch isn't playing along with Jack Lew's exhortation for "economic patriotism."

  • EXography: Wall Street migrates south to low-cost Southern cities

    When we think about American finance, the default Image is of a pinstriped banker on Wall Street. But increasingly, the financial services sector, which employs eight million people, is shifting away from the traditional bastions of money.



From the Weekly Standard