More Accountability Articles

  • IRS: Worker took home personal info on 20K workers

    An IRS employee took home personal information on about 20,000 IRS workers, former workers and contractors, putting the data at risk for public release, the agency said Tuesday. The employee took home a computer thumb drive containing names, Social Security numbers and addresses of the...

  • CFPB's spending skyrockets nearly 50 percent

    The CFPB balance sheet, published last week by the Fed's board of governors, may do little to quash concerns of critics and some in Congress that the agency needs tighter controls on its spending and additional oversight by those on Capitol Hill.

  • Feds prosecuting fewer people in courts in Kansas

    WICHITA, Kan. — Federal prosecutors charged nearly 21 percent fewer defendants last year in Kansas, led by steep declines in prosecutions of immigration and drug cases, a new report from the federal judiciary shows. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Kansas has faced "gaps in resources" over the...

  • US cites security more to censor, deny records

    The Obama administration has a way to go to fulfill its promises from Day 1 to become the most transparent administration in history. More often than ever, the administration censored government files or outright denied access to them last year under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, cited...

  • Arizona community college may freeze veteran enrollment

    TUCSON, Ariz. — Pima Community College may have to halt enrollment for military veterans due to problems with its record-keeping systems. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs requested last week an examination of whether the college should continue serving veteran students, the Arizona...

  • Examiner Editorial: Transparency is vital all year, not just in Sunshine Week

    Sunday is James Madison’s birthday. He is justly known as the “Father of the Constitution” for his work in Philadelphia at the constitutional convention, as a co-author of The Federalist Papers, and for securing adoption of the Bill of Rights in the first Congress. But Madison is also...

  • Updated: Postal service officials see no conflicts when its top real estate agent also represents buyers

    Officials with the world's largest commercial real estate company have represented both the U.S. Postal Service and buyers of postal properties on at least 10 occasions, a conflict of interest that should be barred, according to a government watchdog. The agreement allowing Los Angeles-based...

  • Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki says agency is open and accountable, then clams up

    Openness and accountability are important to maintain the public's trust in the Department of Veterans Affairs, Secretary Eric Shinseki told a congressional committee Thursday. But then he refused to answer reporters’ questions about whether top administrators were disciplined for...

  • Watchdog uncovers hundreds of unreported, 'reckless' violations at DOJ

    Hundreds of Department of Justice attorneys and other employees have committed "reckless" and "intentional" violations, most of which were never made public, according to a new report by the Project on Government Oversight based on findings from the Justice Department's Office of Professional...

  • Veterans Affairs administrator who 'resigned' over patient deaths still on hospital payroll

    A former top Department of Veterans Affairs hospital administrator who resigned last year rather than face discipline over three patient deaths remains on the medical center's payroll, according to a Georgia newspaper. The revelation in the Augusta Chronicle that Dr. Luke Stapleton, former...

  • Freedom of Information Act law 'terribly, terribly broken,' expert tells Senate panel

    Public frustration is growing over federal agencies' resistance to providing records under the Freedom of Information Act, according to journalists and open government advocates. "We have a weaker FOIA law than Uganda, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico and Russia," said David Cuillier, president of the...

  • Federal officials may be missing massive Medicare Part D fraud

    Massive fraud in Medicare's prescription drug programs may be going untracked, according to a government watchdog.

  • Congressional investigations of Federal Election Commission stalled

    A pair of probes into computer security and staffing breakdowns at the FEC aren't living up to their initial billings, key congressmen indicate in a new report by the Center for Public Integrity.

  • Toil, abuse and endurance in the heartland

    For more than 30 years, a few dozen men with intellectual disabilities — affecting their reasoning and learning — lived in a dot of a place called Atalissa, Iowa. Every morning before dawn, they were sent to eviscerate turkeys at a processing plant, in return for food, lodging, the occasional...

  • Port Authority was used by Chris Christie even before Fort Lee closings

    Chris Christie and his allies at the Port Authority are now entangled in a scandal over the closing of lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge — apparently a politically motivated move. But long before the lane closings, the Port Authority had already been turned into a de facto political...



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Hustle Is Overrated

    The Bryce Harper-Mike Trout showdown is underway and the outcome is, well, inconclusive. In round one Monday night, the Nationals leftfielder walked and went hitless in three at bats while the...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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