More Agriculture Articles

  • Aggressive weed brings woe to Texas cotton growers

    LUBBOCK, Texas (AP) — A fast-spreading weed is causing problems in Texas cotton fields and could cost growers much of their harvest if left unchecked. Pigweed, which can grow as tall as 10 feet and overtake crops, is spreading aggressively in the High Plains this year after becoming resistant...

  • University of Nebraska to host seminar on USDA small business grants

    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — The University of Nebraska is hosting a presentation on how small businesses can secure grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The seminar will take place on July 31 at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's East Union, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. USDA National Program...

  • Food fight: Cafeteria workers say kids don't want Michelle Obama's lunches, sales down in 49 states

    School cafeteria workers slapped as "offensive" the first lady's latest criticism that some school districts have given up and are just lazily serving junk food.

  • The U.S. spent $35 million trying to grow this crop in Afghanistan

    American Soybean Association was given $34.4 million in federal funds in 2009 to try to jumpstart soybean farming in Afghanistan, according to the government watchdog over American work there.

  • USDA: Illinois corn, soybean crops faring well

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Agriculture says Illinois' corn crop is maturing faster than normal and faring well. The USDA says in its weekly crop-status update that 81 percent of the state's corn is rated as either good or excellent. Eighty-two percent of the crop is...

  • Who's really stalling the reform of African food aid

    Farmers agree that it makes sense to buy more food overseas closer to hungry people. But the shipping industry balks at losing half of its profitable cargo.

  • Agriculture industry seeks to create right to farm

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — In the nation's agricultural heartland, farming is more than a multibillion-dollar industry that feeds the world. It could be on track to become a right, written into law alongside the freedom of speech and religion. Some powerful agriculture interests want to...

  • Ranchers taking advantage of USDA disaster program

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Farmers and ranchers who suffered heavy livestock and grazing losses over the last three years due to extreme weather have been quick to take advantage of newly available disaster relief funds, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Wednesday. As of July 2, the agency has...

  • State: Website links fishers, farmers, buyers

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — The state Office of Community Development is touting the online Louisiana MarketMaker program that provides a database of local fishers, farmers and food retailers, matching food producers with consumer markets and thus potential buyers. NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune...

  • Proposed EPA water rule lights up Capitol Hill fireworks

    Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy described the haranguing her agency has received over its proposed "Waters of the U.S." rule this way: "Just ludicrous."

  • Rule barring puppy mill K9 imports near

    Six years after Congress approved a law to prevent young dogs bred at foreign puppy mills from being dumped on U.S. shores, some with rabies and other diseases, the administration has failed to act, drawing new criticism from the Humane Society of the United States.

  • Obama moves to save the honey bees, targets pesticides

    President Obama on Friday announced plans to save endangered honey bees and other pollinators, for the first time ordering a probe into new types of pesticides that some local governments and 15 European Union nations have restricted or banned.



From the Weekly Standard