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More Budgets and Deficits Articles

  • Earmarks never went away --- they changed addresses

    Lawmakers now haggle with executive branch officials for funds rather than each other through a process known as "letter-marking" or "phone-marking."

  • Audit finds problems in Perry's deal-closing fund

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A pet program of Republican Texas Gov. Rick Perry that has given a half-billion dollars in taxpayer funds to companies including Toyota and Facebook failed to support claims about job creation and competition from other states, according to a state audit released Thursday....

  • Detroit residents may get vacant lots for $100

    DETROIT (AP) — Plans call for allowing some Detroit residents to buy vacant lots next to their properties for $100. The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press report City Council on Tuesday approved the transfer of about 10,000 parcels of vacant city land to the Detroit Land Bank following an...

  • GE to give Penn State $10M for gas drilling center

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — General Electric Co. says it will give Penn State University up to $10 million to create a new center for natural gas industry research. Penn State President Eric Barron says in a Wednesday morning statement that the center will produce tangible benefits to the industry, to...

  • Illinois among top in US for campaign ad spending

    CHICAGO (AP) — If it seems as though the number of political ads on television has ramped up markedly this election, now there's concrete proof. Fueled by a neck-and-neck contest for governor including a wealthy Republican candidate with money to burn, Illinois has seen a roughly 30 percent...

  • Federal prison population drops by roughly 4,800

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal prison population has dropped in the last year by roughly 4,800, the first time in several decades that the inmate count has gone down, according to the Justice Department. In a speech Tuesday in New York City, Attorney General Eric Holder said the Justice...

  • NY senate candidate sued by ex-employer quits race

    MINEOLA, N.Y. (AP) — A candidate for the New York Senate said he is withdrawing from the race amid allegations from his former law firm that he created at least $2 million in fictitious client bills, falsified expenses and forged the signatures of federal judges on phony court documents. David...

  • Transportation funding becomes New Jersey priority

    Funding for transportation projects has long been simmering as an issue in New Jersey. Now, it's coming to a boil. Last week, a coalition of business, consumer advocate and planning groups called for a new funding structure. Days later, Gov. Chris Christie nominated Democrat Jamie Fox to head...

  • IRS paid $5.2 billion in fraudulent refunds

    In a report issued Monday, the GAO said the IRS stopped $24.2 billion in theft, but the extent of the fraud is "unknown."

  • US existing home sales fall in August

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer Americans bought homes in August, as investors retreated from real estate and first-time buyers remained scarce. Sales of existing homes fell 1.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.05 million, the National Association of Realtors said Monday. That snaps a...

  • Higher supply, costs cut Ohio farmers' profits

    DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — Ohio corn farmers might be producing more crops, but the boom in supply and higher expenses are driving down profits this year. Most farmers are reporting they are producing more bushels this year, but the price they're able to get for the commodity has been roughly cut in...

  • Top brass weighs on Pentagon

    The U.S. military is more top-heavy than it ever has been, after decades of adding generals and admirals while the enlisted ranks shrank and budget cuts forced many lower-ranking officers out of the service.

  • The many costs of the ’94 crime bill

    The Omnibus Crime Bill caused the number of increase by more than 45 percent — the number of inmates in American prisons and jails grew from 1.01 million in 1994 to 2.3 million today.

  • Senators look to lame-duck session to pass Internet sales tax bill

    Top Senate lawmakers think they have found a way to allow states and local governments to tax Internet purchases: Link online sales taxes to separate legislation prohibiting Internet access taxes, then pass it in the post-election "lame duck" session of Congress.

  • Boehner stresses tax reform, school choice in GOP agenda

    In an abbreviated replay of past Republican pre-election agendas, House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday laid out a plan for the GOP to boost economic growth with a combination of old-school conservative policies such as reforming taxes and cutting spending as well as newer priorities.



From the Weekly Standard

  • Ancient to Modern

    “Chemistry and Physics Get Million from Loeb,” blared the Har vard Crimson headline. “Funds will modernize laboratory facilities and establish chemistry chairs.” The donor: scientist Morris...

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  • 60 Percent of Voters Want Obamacare to Be Repealed

    A new poll finds that three-fifths of likely voters support the repeal of Obamacare.  A large plurality — 44 percent — wants to see Obamacare repealed replaced with a conservative alternative. A...

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  • House of Cards

    Boston

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