More Budgets and Deficits Articles

  • Education, immigrant groups to debate tuition bill

    DAVIE, Fla. — College officials and immigrant advocates are pushing for state legislation that would let undocumented students in Florida pay in-state college tuition rates. University administrators, students and lawmakers will discuss several tuition proposals Thursday at a Broward College...

  • Greg Abbott shifts to schools in Texas governor's race

    Republican Greg Abbott is ready to shift the Texas governor's race back to education — but not over classroom spending cuts.

  • Plan would put Minneapolis city data on Internet

    MINNEAPOLIS — A city of Minneapolis plan to make available its databases to the public could lead to new cellphone apps, and help make city government more efficient. The city has more than 450 different electronic databases that track everything from budgets to crime statistics to street...

  • No national system to track landslide hazards

    SEATTLE — People living in the path of a deadly Washington state landslide had virtually no warning before a wall of mud, trees and other debris thundered down the mountain. Some of the homeowners didn't even know the hillside could give way at any time. Unlike the warning systems and...

  • Negotiations to begin on Oklahoma budget, policy

    Oklahoma's governor and Republican legislative leaders agree in principle on cutting taxes, a multi-million dollar overhaul of the Capitol and revamping the pension system for state workers, but each side has different ideas on the specifics.

  • New York leaders, Gov. Andrew Cuomo reach deal on budget

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders have reached agreement on a $140 billion budget that would provide some tax relief for businesses, homeowners and renters and add $340 million for pre-kindergarten mainly in New York City.

  • 5 Things to Know about the Colorado budget

    DENVER (AP) — The Colorado House approved a $23 billion budget Friday. The spending plan heads to the Senate for consideration next week. Here are 5 things to know about the budget for the 2014-2015 fiscal year. HOW BIG IS THE BUDGET? The proposed budget is larger than the current budget...

  • Big Ideas: On serving sizes, sales taxes and green eating

    One size rarely fits all. You wouldn't buy clothes from a store offering only the largest sizes, blindly accepting the word of the proprietor that a super-sized pair of slacks is what you want and need.

  • North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory, NC DOT secretary worried about road money

    McCrory told a North Carolina Chamber conference the state's transportation projects will be delayed if Congress fails to re-authorize a law expiring this fall.

  • Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn: Extending income tax hike is 'tough choice'

    Gov. Pat Quinn knows trying to make the state's temporary income tax increase permanent will be a "tough choice" for Illinois lawmakers, but that the issue could be even tougher for voters who'll decide if the Chicago Democrat gets another term.

  • Colorado has more money to spend next year

    DENVER (AP) — Colorado's public schools and colleges are getting hundreds of millions in next year's proposed budget to make up for cuts in previous years, and with the economy on the upswing, there's money left over to save for a rainy day. But more money to spend means more wrangling when...

  • House Republicans attempt to renew focus on debt

    House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling is trying to draw attention back to the nation’s mounting debt ahead of midterm elections that are more likely to revolve around Obamacare. The Texas Republican scheduled a series of hearings on the debt, he says, after reading a...

  • Do North Carolinians love corporate welfare?

    Politicians of both parties like to attack "corporate welfare," because the attack taps into both liberal and conservative sensibilities.

  • Correction: United States-Asia-Military story

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story March 25 about top U.S. military officers in the Asia-Pacific region voicing concern about the impact of budget cuts, The Associated Press incorrectly spelled the name of the commander of U.S. forces in South Korea, Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti. A corrected version of...

  • New York lawmakers say budget talks progressing

    New York legislative leaders who met for hours behind closed doors Tuesday trying to finalize the state budget due next week came away saying they were making progress.



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Hustle Is Overrated

    The Bryce Harper-Mike Trout showdown is underway and the outcome is, well, inconclusive. In round one Monday night, the Nationals leftfielder walked and went hitless in three at bats while the...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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