More Columnists Articles

  • Charles Koch fights back with Big Government critique

    Is it too farfetched to connect the dots between a brilliant Wall Street Journal op-ed by Charles Koch, the chairman and CEO of Koch Industries, and the continued sluggish recovery in jobs, business investment and the overall economy? I don't think so. In his piece, Koch seems to make a plea...

  • Lab tests pet DNA to help solve crimes

    As far as crime laboratories go, it is not very impressive-looking. And it is not very big, with a permanent staff of just three forensic scientists and a few interns. But the work product that comes out of the Veterinarian Forensic Lab at the University of California, Davis is important, and it...

  • Five of the Obama Doctrine's stealth foreign policy failures

    On a Moscow train platform, two men smoke and swap rumors in the frozen evening air. “I hear they've raised the Russian flag in Donetsk?” one says. “I hear Crimea, too.” So reports freelance journalist Noah Sneider in Slate. As Russian troops hoisted their flag over Crimea,...

  • Two interviews, big contrasts: Marco Rubio and Hillary Clinton

    Two interviews this week with two potential GOP candidates for president in 2016. Two very different reactions from Beltway media, and those differences tell us much about the GOP problems and opportunities ahead, especially when combined with the reaction to New York Times' columnist Thomas...

  • Ukrainians, and Americans, are the children of history

    If you've been following events in Ukraine closely, you may have seen maps, available at electoralgeography.com, showing how the ethnic Russian areas voted heavily for one candidate and the ethnic Ukrainian areas for another. However, as the eminent historians of Eastern Europe Timothy Snyder...

  • Lifting campaign spending limits helps democracy

    The Supreme Court's decision last week in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, eliminating the total limit that an individual can contribute in an election cycle to candidates and party committees, amounts to a shot of adrenalin to American democracy.

  • Lobbyist bundlers, not rich donors, soil political money

    Rich people can now donate more money politicians, thanks to the First Amendment and the U.S. Supreme Court. The court’s ruling in McCutcheon v Federal Election Commission won’t change politics much. But it ought to spur Congress to clean up our cluttered and counterproductive campaign...

  • Untangling Common Core groups from lobbyists is impossible

    Attention, class: A Common Core mouthpiece wants to rap my knuckles with his Gates Foundation-funded ruler. In response to my column two weeks ago about the marketing overlords pushing the Fed Ed racket, Chad Colby of Achieve Inc. demanded corrections. Let's go to school. "I wanted to take a...

  • What's race and ethnicity got to do with the Fort Hood shooting?

    I like Megyn Kelly. The Fox News anchor is smart, lively and gorgeous. But she's managed to walk right into a controversy over race and ethnicity, and it's not the first time. These are treacherous waters for anyone in media -- but especially so for media personalities who are perceived as...

  • Democrats squawk as cracks form in immigration coalition

    Immigration reform advocates are fond of citing broad support for their cause. But in fact the coalition behind the Senate Gang of Eight comprehensive reform bill is fragile and loosely cobbled together. How could Big Labor and the Chamber of Commerce and the tech world and Big Agriculture all...



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Hustle Is Overrated

    The Bryce Harper-Mike Trout showdown is underway and the outcome is, well, inconclusive. In round one Monday night, the Nationals leftfielder walked and went hitless in three at bats while the...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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