More Drones Articles

  • Drones: Next big thing in aviation is small

    LONDON (AP) — The next big thing in aviation may be really small. With some no bigger than a hummingbird, the hottest things at this week's Farnborough International Airshow are tiny compared with the titans of the sky, such as the Airbus 380 or the Boeing Dreamliner. What's got aviation...

  • Egypt proposes cease-fire between Israel, Hamas

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Egypt presented a cease-fire plan Monday to end a week of heavy fighting between Israel and Hamas militants in the Gaza Strip that has left at least 185 people dead, and both sides said they were seriously considering the proposal. The late-night offer by Egypt marked the...

  • San Diego utility wins FAA OK to test drones

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — San Diego Gas & Electric says it will begin testing drone aircraft to help patrol for outages and wildfires in remote areas. SDG&E announced Friday that it's become the first utility in the nation to win approval from Federal Aviation Administration to test drones and train...

  • Officials: US drone strike in Pakistan kills 6

    DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan (AP) — A suspected American drone fired two missiles at a compound in a troubled Pakistani tribal region on Thursday, killing six militants, two intelligence officials said. The strike happened in the town of in Datta Khel in North Waziristan, where Pakistan army...

  • New York police see risks with drones' popularity

    NEW YORK (AP) — One private drone crash-landed in midtown Manhattan. Another caused alarm by hovering over Times Square amid tight security during Super Bowl week. Most recently, authorities say, another had a close brush with a police helicopter near the George Washington Bridge. Even though...

  • Bombs bursting in air: America's airpower advantage, 1944-2014

    Sometime during the spring of 1944, Allied commanders concluded that their air forces had secured air superiority over an area stretching from Great Britain to central France as well as parts of Belgium and Holland. Driving the German Luftwaffe from western European skies was a costly process...

  • German minister backs weapons-capable drones

    BERLIN (AP) — Germany's defense minister wants to buy weapons-capable drones to protect soldiers from attack, drawing criticism in a country where the U.S. use of drones to kill terror suspects has caused unease. Ursula von der Leyen told lawmakers Wednesday that the German military has had...

  • Drone access to US skies faces significant hurdles

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal effort to provide civilian drones regular access to U.S. skies faces significant hurdles and won't meet a September 2015 deadline set by Congress, a government watchdog said Monday. Despite years of research, the Federal Aviation Administration hasn't figured out...

  • Pentagon: Armed drones guard US interests in Iraq

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. has armed drones flying over Baghdad to protect U.S. troops that recently arrived to assess Iraq's deteriorating security, the Pentagon said Friday. The military for more than a week has been flying manned and unmanned aircraft over Iraq, averaging a few dozen...

  • Who to kill? Obama's drone policy is more about politics than law

    The Obama administration’s justification for the killing of American citizen Anwar al-Awlaki in 2011 has always been somewhat murky. Awlaki was killed in Yemen along with another American, Samir Khan (editor of the al Qaeda magazine “Inspire”), when a missile fired from an American drone...

  • Drones could help Miss. farm industry

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The applications for drones have softened, shifting from machines of war to whirlybirds that can capture incredible aerial photos of any event under the sun. The newest possibility mixes that magic with cost-savings that could prove revolutionary for Mississippi's...

  • What went wrong in Iraq

    When the United States invaded Iraq in March 2003, Americans were told it would be a quick, simple project. When asked how long the war might last, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said airily, "Six days, six weeks, I doubt six months."

  • Tech industry looks forward, politicians look back

    Silicon Valley and the tech industry exude so much optimism it's contagious. There is a desire to solve the planet's most difficult problems and a belief they can do it.

  • Obama not ruling out airstrikes in Iraq

    President Obama on Thursday said he wasn't ruling out any potential U.S. responses to the escalating violence in Iraq, as insurgents there have captured multiple major cities and are marching towards Baghdad in hopes of launching a full-out civil war in the Middle Eastern country.

  • Green light given to BP's Alaskan operation for first commercial drone flights over land

    The largest oil field facility in North America on Alaska's North Slope will soon be patrolled in part by an unmanned aerial vehicle called the Puma. BP PLC will begin using the drone made by AeroVironment for monitoring field operations at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, after getting approval from the...



From the Weekly Standard

  • No Sword, No Justice

    On Tuesday, President Obama visited the Dutch embassy in Washington to pay his respects to the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, shot down over Ukraine by forces armed and backed by Vladimir...

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  • A New Disorder

    Moments of clarity often come when you least expect them. In a speech to contributors last week in Seattle, Barack Obama made the case that his presidency has made America better. In most...

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  • Frozen in the Cold War

    In 1983, Barack Obama was a senior at Columbia University. He was not well known. He lived off-campus, had a few close friends, and spent a lot of time reading. He went to some meetings of the...

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