More Economy Articles

  • Ignoring the U.S. debt problem won't wash it away

    Just like a heart patient straying from his diet as time passes after his heart attack, the political class has collectively decided to tune out the federal debt as an issue.

  • US bank earnings up 5.2 percent in 2Q

    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks' earnings rose 5.2 percent in the April-June quarter from a year earlier, as banks reduced their expenses and lending marked its fastest pace since 2007. The data issued Thursday by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. showed a robust picture as the banking industry...

  • Obama touts revised economic growth numbers

    WASHINGTON (AP) — New evidence of economic growth is heartening and underscores that companies are investing and consumers are spending, President Barack Obama said Thursday. "There are reasons to feel good about the direction we are heading," the president told reporters at the White House....

  • FBI investigates 'Russian' cyberattack on Wall Street

    One of the companies attacked in mid-August was the nation's largest bank, JPMorgan Chase & Co., a representative for the bank confirmed.

  • US economy grew at brisk 4.2 pct. rate in Q2

    WASHINGTON (AP) — After a bleak start to the year, the U.S. economy grew at a brisk annual rate of 4.2 percent in the April-June quarter, the government said Thursday, slightly faster than it had first estimated. The upward revision supported expectations that the second half of 2014 will prove...

  • Editorial cartoon: Labor Day picnic

    Cartoon by Gary Varvel/Creators Syndicate.

  • Ukraine fears weigh on stocks in morning trading

    The escalating conflict in Ukraine weighed on U.S. Thursday, helping push the major stock indexes lower in morning trading. An encouraging report on U.S. economic growth and the job market weren't enough to stop the selling. KEEPING SCORE: The S&P 500 fell four points, or 0.2 percent, to 1,995...

  • Contracts to buy US homes rise in hopeful sign

    WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans signed contracts to buy homes in July, a sign that buying has improved as mortgage rates have slipped, the number of listings has risen and the rate of price increases has slowed. The National Association of Realtors said Thursday that its seasonally adjusted...

  • Economy grows faster than expected

    U.S. gross domestic product grew at a 4.2 percent annual rate in the second quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported Thursday.

  • Budget crunchers now expect a permanently weaker economy

    Updated CBO projections of the US economy predict a future of slower growth and lower productivity.

  • Asian stocks post cautious gains, Qantas surges

    TOKYO (AP) — Asian stock markets were mostly higher Thursday but gains were muted ahead of U.S. economic data and possible policy announcements from Japan. KEEPING SCORE: The Nikkei 225, the benchmark for the Tokyo Stock Exchange, inched down 0.5 percent to 15,450.42. Hong Kong's Hang Seng...

  • SEC adopts rules on loan-backed securities

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators on Wednesday voted to require financial firms that sell securities backed by loans, like the kind that fueled the 2008 financial crisis, to give investors details on borrowers' credit records and income. The Securities and Exchange Commission adopted the...

  • Stocks drift higher; S&P 500 holds on to 2,000

    Stocks are drifting mostly higher as a main U.S. index sets a record for a third day in a row. The Standard & Poor's 500 eked out a gain of one-tenth of a point, enough to set another all-time high. The index closed at 2,000.12 points, a day after its first close above 2,000. The Dow Jones...

  • 10 things to know about corporate inversions

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Burger King is drawing a lot of flak over plans to shift its legal address to a foreign country by merging with Tim Hortons, the Canadian coffee-and-doughnut chain. The transaction is called a corporate inversion, a maneuver that is becoming popular among companies looking to...

  • Regulators OK overhaul of credit rating agencies

    The Securities and Exchange Commission voted to adopt two rules intended to prevent weak or fraudulent loans from being bundled into securities and sold to investors, including an overhaul of the way that rating agencies work.



From the Weekly Standard