More Energy and Environment Articles

  • Top federal officials discuss energy development

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The potential for renewable energy development in the Southwest is tremendous, but two top officials in President Barack Obama's administration said Monday much work needs to be done to meet the challenges of exporting that power to market. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell...

  • Mexico opens gas, oil to foreign, private firms

    MEXICO CITY (AP) — President Enrique Pena Nieto signed into law on Monday new rules governing a historic opening of Mexico's state-run oil, gas and electricity industries to foreign and private companies. Pena Nieto said the government will let potential investors know by Wednesday which blocks...

  • Yellowstone recommends removing about 900 bison

    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Yellowstone National Park administrators are recommending the removal of roughly 900 bison next winter through hunting, shipments to slaughter and for research purposes. The proposal represents about 19 percent of the park's wild bison. It would be the largest cull of the...

  • Mine spill forces water cutbacks in north Mexico

    MEXICO CITY (AP) — About 10 million gallons (40,000 cubic meters) of contaminated wastewater have spilled into rivers from a mine in northern Mexico, and federal officials announced Sunday they are restricting water supply to cities and towns in the country's north, including the Sonora state...

  • Weather may hamper 'stubborn' California wildfire

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Unsettled weather, including possible lightning strikes, may add fuel to an already stubborn wildfire threatening homes in a parched area of Northern California, officials said Sunday. Crews battling the lightning-sparked blaze burning in steep, rugged terrain near...

  • Dispute strands oil-laden tanker off Galveston

    HOUSTON (AP) — A question of ownership has kept a tanker of 1 million barrels of Iraqi crude oil anchored and waiting about 60 miles off the Galveston coast for nearly two weeks. The Houston Chronicle (http://bit.ly/1onqWrK) reports that the United Kalavryta arrived July 26 with crude oil...

  • Study: Keystone carbon pollution more than figured

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study concludes that the much-debated Keystone XL pipeline could produce four times more global warming pollution than the State Department calculated this year. The proposed pipeline would carry oil from tar sands in western Canada to Texas. The researchers estimate it...

  • Farms are focus of studies on drinking water toxin

    TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Scientists and farmers agree that phosphorus from agriculture runoff is feeding the blue-green algae blooms on Lake Erie linked to a toxin found in the drinking water of 400,000 people in Ohio and southeastern Michigan last week. Ohio's political leaders are calling for more...

  • Codfish numbers at key fishery hits all-time low

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The level of codfish spawning in one of the most critical fisheries in the Northeast U.S. is at an all-time low. National Marine Fisheries Service scientists say the amount of cod spawning in the Gulf of Maine is estimated at 3 to 4 percent of its target level. That...

  • Study finds fracking could revive manufacturing

    As many as one million new manufacturing jobs could be created in the U.S. by 2025 thanks to the abundance of natural gas now available because of advances in fracking technology.

  • This one video shows the shocking extent of California's current drought in just a matter of seconds

    Watch California's drought unfold in less than 10 seconds.

  • Why the U.S. could be the big winner of Mexico's energy reforms

    Mexico's Congress approved changes this week to open energy development to foreign firms, which could attract large companies like ExxonMobil to deepwater projects and smaller, independent ones that have led an oil and gas boom north of the border to Mexico's shale plays.

  • FERC commissioner John Norris resigns from energy regulator

    The Democrat will leave the five-member board Aug. 20 to take a job with the Agriculture Department in Rome.

  • Why environmentalists and unions are spending big in Michigan

    They're dropping $2.1 million for a voter turnout operation aimed at lifting Democratic Rep. Gary Peters to the Senate.

  • Stakes are high in fracking debate on Indian reservations

    For Native Americans, the debate over fracking on reservations is not much different from the arguments elsewhere. But the stakes are vastly higher.



From the Weekly Standard

  • No Mo’ Cuomo?

    Queens, N.Y. Peter Tu is thrilled about meeting with Rob Astorino, the Republican candidate for governor of New York. Tu is the executive director of the Flushing Chinese Business Association...

    Read More...
  • Hamas’s Media Strategy

    During the six weeks of Israel’s Operation Protective Edge, Hamas has used human shields—women and children—to protect its infrastructure in Gaza. This tactic is meant either to deter Israel from...

    Read More...
  • Scotland the Brave

    If at first you don’t secede, try, try again. This might be the motto of Alex Salmond’s Scottish National party, which since 1934 has been advocating the proposition that Scotland should be an...

    Read More...