More Energy and Environment Articles

  • Agency reconsidering water for Klamath salmon

    A federal agency said Friday it is taking another look at releasing water in Northern California's Klamath Basin to prevent the spread of disease among salmon returning to spawn in drought conditions. A decision is likely next week following discussions with fisheries biologists and others,...

  • Nuclear reactor near NYC running after shutdown

    BUCHANAN, N.Y. (AP) — A nuclear power reactor near New York City is operating again, two days after a faulty sensor led to an automatic shutdown. Indian Point in Westchester County says Unit 3 restarted Friday. It went offline Wednesday when a sensor detected a reactor pressure change....

  • Indianapolis utility to convert coal plant to gas

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An aging coal-fired power plant that Indianapolis' utility company had faced growing pressure to retire will be converted to cleaner-burning natural gas if state regulators endorse a revised plan the company announced Friday. Indianapolis Power & Light President and CEO...

  • Tour de Turtles tracks migration paths

    MARATHON, Fla. (AP) — A loggerhead sea turtle, rehabilitated at The Turtle Hospital, joined a "race" Friday against 10 other turtles after being released on a Florida Keys beach with a satellite-tracking transmitter affixed to its shell. "Pine Tyme" became the last competitor to join the Tour...

  • SeaWorld plans bigger killer whale environments

    NEW YORK (AP) — After more than a year of public criticism of its treatment of killer whales, SeaWorld said Friday that it will build new, larger environments at its theme parks and will fund additional research on the animals along with programs to protect ocean health and whales in the wild....

  • California regulators approve PG&E rate hike

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California regulators approved a nearly $2.4 billion rate hike for Pacific Gas and Electric Co. customers that will see the typical customer's monthly bill increase by $7.50 starting in the fall and then even more in 2015 and again in 2016. The California Public Utilities...

  • Correction: Erie-Wells story

    ERIE, Colo. (AP) — In a story Aug. 13 about 13 oil and gas wells approved by Erie town trustees near two subdivisions, The Associated Press reported erroneously that some would violate state drilling setback rules. State rules require wells to be at least 500 feet from homes and 1,000 feet from...

  • Federal court backs key electric grid policy

    A federal court on Friday upheld a key rule designed to spur investment in expensive electric grid infrastructure that could connect more people to renewable energy and other power sources.

  • The Energy Department is stepping out of the way on natural gas exports. So why isn't the industry happy?

    The Energy Department is changing it's approval process for some applications, and the natural gas industry is less than thrilled.

  • India deals a blow to climate negotiations

    Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, leader of the world's third-largest greenhouse gas-emitting nation, won't join his U.S. and Chinese counterparts at a United Nations climate summit next month in New York.

  • Study blames humans for most of melting glaciers

    WASHINGTON (AP) — More than two-thirds of the recent rapid melting of the world's glaciers can be blamed on humans, a new study finds. Scientists looking at glacier melt since 1851 didn't see a human fingerprint until about the middle of the 20th century. Even then only one-quarter of the...

  • New study explores sinister side of meerkats

    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — One of the most captivating sights of African wildlife is that of dark-eyed meerkats standing side-by-side on their hind legs, as though posing for a group photograph. They look cuddly and endearing. But a new study says they have a dark side. The dominant female meerkat in...

  • Illinois EPA to collect household toxic waste

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency will collect household hazardous waste in six communities this fall. The agency said Wednesday that residents can bring leftover chemicals and other toxic wastes to sites in DuPage, Henry, Logan, Marion, Ogle and Piatt...

  • Why opponents don't like the EPA's climate-change math

    The "social cost of carbon" has sparked criticism from the Right because they say it inflates the perceived benefits from regulating greenhouse gases.

  • Californians to vote on $7.5 billion water plan

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Driven to action by the state's historic drought, California lawmakers on Wednesday voted to place a $7.5 billion water plan before voters in November. The measure marks the largest investment in decades in the state's water infrastructure and is designed to build...



From the Weekly Standard

  • An Appalling Propaganda Ploy

    The Islamic State, an al Qaeda offshoot, has released a grisly video of one of its fighters beheading a man who appears to be James Foley, an American journalist who was kidnapped in Syria on...

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  • IS Threatens Another U.S. Journalist

    The Islamic State’s official media arm, Furqan Media, has just released a video showing the beheading of American photojournalist James Wright Foley. The terrorist organization claims that the...

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  • Fear Itself

    Julie Gunlock is one mother who’ll welcome the return of pink slime. As the Wall Street Journal reported recently, the beef product processed from scraps left over from butchered cattle all but...

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