More Energy and Environment Articles

  • BLM says 6 cattle died in disputed Nevada roundup

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Six animals died in a federal roundup of cattle that officials say rancher Cliven Bundy allowed to graze illegally for 20 years on public land outside his southern Nevada property, the Bureau of Land Management said Tuesday. Four animals were euthanized, including one cow and...

  • Spring corn planting still sputters in key states

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — At a time most years when farmers would be in full swing of planting corn, Stanley Blunier and most other growers near his central Illinois farm still hadn't begun the annual ritual on Tuesday because fields simply are too wet or too cold to be receptive to fragile seeds....

  • Expanded don't-call list, fuel protections advance

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — An expanded "do-not-call" registry that includes text messaging and new protections for heating oil customers were among several consumer protection bills that cleared the Connecticut Senate on Tuesday and will head to the House for final action. One bill that would add...

  • EPA scales back biofuel mandate to reflect reality

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is significantly reducing the amount of cellulosic biofuels refiners will have to prove they blended into gasoline last year, acknowledging that the market lagged far behind government projections. The EPA on Tuesday said it was basing its 2013...

  • City, utility want rate hike for car-sharing plan

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indianapolis Power and Light and the city of Indianapolis are seeking a $16 million rate hike to pay for a proposed electric car sharing program. The Indianapolis Star reports (http://indy.st/1lvE34Z ) IPL research analyst Kimberly Berry says in a filing with the Indiana...

  • Oil companies fight ND plan to slow production

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Dr. Lyle Best traveled nearly 200 miles from the heart of North Dakota's oil patch Tuesday to tell state regulators one thing: "Slow down." The North Dakota Industrial Commission is considering a proposal that would cut back on the state's booming oil production as a...

  • WVa chemical safe level based on 2 weeks exposure

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — When federal officials decided what chemical levels West Virginians could safely consume in water tainted by a January spill, their standard assumed people would be exposed for two weeks, not 100-plus days. Months later, Centers for Disease Control and Protection...

  • Maine baby lobster decline could end high catches

    YARMOUTH, Maine (AP) — The number of baby lobsters settling off the rocky coast of Maine continues to steadily decline — possibly foreshadowing an end to the recent record catches that have boosted New England's lobster fishery, scientists say. A University of Maine survey of 11 Gulf of...

  • Splash: Hollywood mermaid Daryl Hannah condemns Keystone XL 'serpent'

    The debate over building the Keystone XL oil pipeline took a weird turn Tuesday when a Hollywood actress famous for playing a comedic mermaid called the economic lifeline the real life embodiment of some legendary “serpent” destined to doom America. “Legend tells of a black snake that...

  • Arch Coal reports wider 1Q loss

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — Arch Coal Inc. said Tuesday that its first-quarter loss widened as weaker prices and demand cut into its margins, prompting the mine operator to shave its outlook for shipments of coal used in making steel. The loss was bigger than analysts had expected, and its shares...

  • The oil and gas industry is just like slavery, didn't you know?

    An anti-fracking activist and former Environmental Protection Agency “whistleblower” compared the fossil fuel industry to slavery during a debate Monday at Colorado Christian University. Wes Wilson, who once accused the EPA of shoddy science because of a report showing no evidence that...

  • Correction: Biofuels-Global Warming story

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story April 20 about new research showing biofuels made with corn leftovers are worse for global warming than gasoline in the short term, The Associated Press erroneously reported that cellulosic biofuels that failed to release 60 percent less carbon than gasoline...

  • Tribal chairman says oil production rivals states

    NEW TOWN, N.D. (AP) — Leaders of North Dakota's Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara nations say the tribes' oil production levels are higher than most U.S. states. Tex Hall, chairman of the Three Affiliated Tribes, said the more than 1,000 wells in the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation produce more...

  • Globe had 4th hottest March; US cooler than normal

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal forecasters calculated that for most of the Earth, last month was one of the hottest Marchs on record — except in the United States. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Tuesday that it was the fourth hottest March in 135 years of records. The...

  • Plaza hotel, NYC face off over bike-sharing rack

    NEW YORK (AP) — A landmarked space across the street from the legendary Plaza hotel is no place for the city's popular bike-sharing system to park some of its electric-blue rides, the hotel's lawyers told a judge Tuesday. But city attorneys said the spot on Grand Army Plaza is just right for...



From the Weekly Standard

  • Why the New York Times Poll Is Bogus

    The Arkansas Senate race has been close in virtually every serious poll. The Republican challenger, Tom Cotton, probably had a small lead a month or so ago; after a massive negative assault on him...

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  • Hustle Is Overrated

    The Bryce Harper-Mike Trout showdown is underway and the outcome is, well, inconclusive. In round one Monday night, the Nationals leftfielder walked and went hitless in three at bats while the...

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  • Kennedy’s Question

    We often think of the Constitution as a two-part document: first the original 1787 text, which primarily establishes the government’s structure; and then the amendments, which primarily set...

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