More Energy and Environment Articles

  • Hurricane Marie weakens in Mexican Pacific

    MEXICO CITY (AP) — Hurricane Marie has weakened to a Category 2 storm, but continues kicking up high swells along Mexico's northern Pacific coast and threatens to raise dangerous waves along the Southern California coast. The U.S. Hurricane Center in Miami says Marie's maximum sustained winds...

  • No wrongdoing in 'social cost of carbon' development, says federal watchdog

    The federal government used sound methods to develop its updated "social cost of carbon," a tool used to measure damages inflicted by rising carbon pollution, according to the Government Accountability Office.

  • Snyder wants review of radioactive waste standards

    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Gov. Rick Snyder ordered a review Monday of state standards for disposing certain types of radioactive waste in landfills, responding to public anger over the disclosure that material generated in Pennsylvania but rejected for storage there would be shipped to...

  • Scott Brown on whether man-made climate change proven: 'No'

    The GOP New Hampshire Senate candidate said Friday that climate change is not man-made, a reversal of the position he held when he unsuccessfully defended his Massachusetts Senate seat in 2012.

  • Politicians cheer Pittsburgh airport gas drilling

    IMPERIAL, Pa. (AP) — The start of natural gas drilling near the Pittsburgh International Airport was cheered Monday by Pennsylvania politicians from both parties. The ceremony to celebrate the recent start of drilling featured remarks by Republican Gov. Tom Corbett, Democratic County Executive...

  • Reforms could boost Mexican oil production 75 percent, says Energy Department's statistics arm

    Mexican oil production could increase 75 percent by 2040 compared with previous long-term trends as a result of reforms that would let foreign companies develop energy there, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said Monday.

  • North Dakota winter wheat crop hurt by disease

    MINOT, N.D. (AP) — Some North Dakota grain elevators are urging farmers to bin their newly harvested winter wheat until the market figures out what to do with a heavily diseased crop. The crop is showing high levels of vomitoxin — a toxin associated with scab disease that can make grain unsafe...

  • Japan PM visits landslide site as complaints swirl

    TOKYO (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visited Hiroshima on Monday as rescuers expanded their search for 28 people missing in landslides five days ago that killed more than 50 people. Rain showers raised risks for more slides, hampering the search effort and also triggering slides...

  • Invasive insect threatens iconic Florida citrus

    LAKE WALES, Fla. (AP) — Citrus has always been synonymous with Florida. The orange adorns the state license plate. The University of Florida's famed football stadium was named after an orange magnate. There is even a county called Citrus. Throughout the decades, the citrus industry has always...

  • Survey: U.S. gas prices down 4 cents per gallon

    CAMARILLO, Calif. (AP) — The average U.S. price of gasoline has dipped 4 cents per gallon in the past two weeks, and prices in California have fallen 5 cents in the same time period. According to the Lundberg Survey released Sunday, the average nationwide price for a gallon of regular is now...

  • California push to avert higher gas prices stalls

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Lawmakers from both parties are pushing to halt an increase in the price of gasoline and other fuels expected to hit consumers in January, but their efforts appear to be dead with just a week to go in the legislative session. A pair of bills — one sponsored by...

  • Pro and con to argue Mass. natural gas pipeline

    DALTON, Mass. (AP) — Representatives of Kinder Morgan are scheduled to visit western Massachusetts to present their side in a debate over a natural gas pipeline expansion. The Berkshire Eagle reports (http://bit.ly/VJLVJ4 ) that Dalton officials intend to organize a panel of residents to argue...

  • Californians tear out lawns to cope with drought

    LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) — As California faces an historic drought, residents are tearing out thirsty lawns to cut down on water use. Water agencies across the state have been encouraging the change by offering thousands of dollars in rebates to help homeowners make the switch to a...

  • Up to 33 Bakken oil trains cross Arkansas weekly

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas emergency officials' records show that as many as 33 trains carrying Bakken crude oil pass through the state in a given week, each one hauling more than the amount spilled in last year's Pegasus pipeline spill in Mayflower, according to documents obtained by The...

  • Pennsylvania considers charging for game land use

    NEW CASTLE, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania may soon charge a fee for snowmobilers, equestrians and mountain bikers who use state game land trails. The Pennsylvania Game Commission will likely vote on the plan next month, the New Castle News (http://bit.ly/1ttxEgt ) reports. The proposed license of up...



From the Weekly Standard

  • ‘We Don’t Have a Strategy Yet’

    "Rooting out a cancer like ISIL won’t be easy and it won’t be quick,” President Obama told the American Legion’s annual convention in Charlotte on Tuesday, August 26. He repeated the thought in...

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  • No Mo’ Cuomo?

    Queens, N.Y. Peter Tu is thrilled about meeting with Rob Astorino, the Republican candidate for governor of New York. Tu is the executive director of the Flushing Chinese Business Association...

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  • Scotland the Brave

    If at first you don’t secede, try, try again. This might be the motto of Alex Salmond’s Scottish National party, which since 1934 has been advocating the proposition that Scotland should be an...

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